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Five Reasons To Love WorldRemit This Holiday Season

If you want to transfer money online to loved ones in Africa, WorldRemit is a safe and easy way to do it.

Sponsored content from WorldRemitToday's world moves fast and the demand for sending money abroad is increasing.

With WorldRemit, you can make a transfer to family and friends in a matter of minutes on your laptop or phone and in most cases, they'll receive it instantly. We are connected to more mobile money services around the world than any other money transfer operator and with mobile money people can instantly receive remittance payments on their phones instead of travelling long distances to foreign exchange bureaus to collect cash.

Around 70% of our transfers are sent from the mobile app, and 90% of our transfers arrive in less than 10 minutes.


​We're low cost

With expensive bank fees, people are looking for cheaper alternatives. They want more than fast transfers; they also want low cost fees. With WorldRemit, we are totally transparent and show our fees and exchange rates up front.

WorldRemit has one of the lowest remittance fees in the industry to send money to countries like Nigeria, Ghana, Kenya, Zimbabwe, Cameroon, South Africa and Uganda.

​We're easy to use

WorldRemit is moving the offline-dominated remittance industry to a mobile future. While the majority of remittances today are still sent through corner shops and bricks-and-mortar money transfer agents, making a transfer with WorldRemit is as easy as sending an instant message.

Instead of people needing to find the time in their busy lives to visit a money transfer agent- during business hours- and then pay extortionate fees to send money home, our customers can simply use our app to send money transfers; allowing them to send money 24/7 with just a few taps on their smartphone.

As a testament to how easy it is to use our platform, we have over 125,000 five-star reviews of our app!

We're secure

Nobody takes care of your hard-earned cash better. We are 100% digital (cashless) and this not only drives down costs but more importantly, adds an additional layer of protection and provides more transparency and control. With this extra security measure, the experience for you sending money is simple, quick, intuitive and safe.

That's why people in over 50 countries trust us to send their money to the people they care about in over 140 countries. We are licensed by government regulators globally and follow each countries regulations to further protect our customers against fraud and safeguard your money.

Zero Fees

Looking to transfer money online to your loved ones in Africa? We are offering zero fees on your first three money transfers when you use the code "3FREE". All you need to do is download our app or sign up on our website, choose where you want to transfer money and how much you want to send. It's super simple to sign up and you can start sending money in minutes. See www.worldremit.com/3FREE for more details (T&Cs apply).

It pays to refer a friend

If you love our service, why not tell your friends? All you need to do is refer your friends to us, and the best part is you'll both get a reward voucher* once they've sent the minimum send amount!

Here's how it works:

1) Share your unique referral code with your friend

2) Ask your friend to enter this code in the referral code box when they sign up for a WorldRemit account.

3) Once they have sent the minimum send amount, you'll both be emailed a voucher

Best of all, you can introduce as many friends as you like and get a voucher each time to use on your next transfer.

News Brief
Photo: Getty

Here's What You Need To Know About The Political Unrest In Sudan

Thousands have been protesting the Sudanese government over the weekend, supporting the military's plans for a coup.

Sudan's transitional government is in turmoil as thousands of citizens conducted a sit-in protest against them, over the weekend. A group of Sudanese citizens have called on the military to disestablish the nation's current government, as the country struggles with the greatest crisis they've seen since the end of former dictator Omar al-Bashir's controversial ruling, two years ago. The weekend's pro-military protests come as anti-military protestors took to the streets earlier this month to fight for civilian-ruled laws.

Military-aligned demonstrators assembled outside of the famously off-limits entrance of the Presidential Palace located in the Sudanese capital, Khartoum on Monday. Gatherers set up tents, blocking off access to two main intersections, cutting off access to the capital for those inside. Police attempted to wave off crowds with teargas, with Khartoum state officials saying they had, "repelled an attempted assault on the seat of government," in a statement issued Monday.

The assembly was called for by a coalition of rebel groups and political parties that support Sudan's military, accusing the civilian political parties of mismanagement and monopolizing power under their ruling. Demonstrations began on Saturday, but Sunday's gathering saw a lower attendance. According to Reuters, by Monday afternoon, thousands, between 2,000 - 3,000, had returned to voice their concerns. 52-year-old tribal elder Tahar Fadl al-Mawla spoke at the helm of the sit-in outside of the Presidential palace saying, "The civilian government has failed. We want a government of soldiers to protect the transition." Alongside a 65-year-old Ahman Jumaa who claimed to have traveled more than 900 kilometers (570 miles) from Southern region Nyala to show his support.

Protesters are demanding the appointment of a new cabinet that is "more representative of the people who participated in the December 2019 revolution that eventually led to the ousting of former president Omar al-Bashir", Al Jazeera reported from Sudan. Protesters headed towards the Presidential Palace, where an emergency cabinet meeting was being held when they were met by police forces.

Pro-civilian political parties have plans for their own demonstration on Thursday, the anniversary of the 1964 revolution that overthrew Sudan's first military regime under Ibrahim Abboud and brought in a period of democracy that the country still struggles to uphold.


Sudanese Twitter users shared their thoughts online, with many drawing similarities between the current unrest and other political crises the nation has faced.


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