Audio

Frank Ocean's 'Nights' Gets a Rework From LIMBS

New York-based duo LIMBS want to provide a relief from this week's pain with their reimagining of Frank Ocean’s “Nights.”

LIMBS are a budding, experimental indie-pop duo consisting of Ethiopian-American producer, Kevin Abdella, and singer Kim Mayo. The two created the majority of their Don’t Stay EP while living on opposite coasts, in Los Angeles and Brooklyn respectively. They finally got the chance to record together after Abdella’s recent move to New York, a change that the group says “feels special and is bringing new energy to our process.”


Today, we premiere the first track born of the group’s new collaborative set-up: an artfully-produced rendition of Frank Ocean’s “Nights,” a standout from the singer’s long-awaited sophomore album Blonde.

"We both loved the recent Frank Ocean releases,” the group tells Okayafrica. “They inspired us to be creative at a time when it is most difficult to be. Those records brought us a lot of solace, comfort, and inspiration, and we wanted to honor those feelings by re-imagining 'Nights' from Blonde.”

The three-and-a-half minute track pairs Mayo’s warm, echoed vocals with ambient production, making for a refreshing take on Ocean’s retrospective ballad.

"We hope that this song gives listeners the same sense of comfort and release from the pain of this election and uncertainty about the future,” the duo says.

Listen to the re-up above and stream the group’s Don’t Stay EP here, along with a gorgeous video for the project's title track. Keep up with LIMBS on Facebook and Twitter.

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D'banj and Kanye West in "Oliver Twist" video.

The 10 Best American Remixes of Nigerian Songs

Featuring Ayo Jay, D'banj, Wizkid, Tiwa Savage, and more

Time was when the mere rumor of an American artist guesting on a Nigerian song was enough to fuel its anticipation. In this new afropop era (circa Tuface Idibia), these international collaborations have become common place, but not enough to make them pass without some fanfare.

A good number of these collaborations are remixes of proven hits, variously attempted by American artists in their prime and those in need of a career boost. Some have being genuine cultural exchanges, while others wear the tear of desperation. Here are 10 of the best of the American remixes of Nigerian songs.

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News Brief

Frank Ocean Covers This Nigerian Disco Song at FYF Fest

Watch Frank Ocean take on Steve Monite's Nigerian disco hit, 'Only You,' at FYF Fest.

DIASPORAFrank Ocean threw it all the way back with this cover during his set at FYF Fest, reports The Fader.

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14 Cultural Events You Can't Miss this December in South Africa

OkayAfrica's guide to must-see events during South Africa's festive season.

South Africans will tell you that December is not just a month, it's an entire lifestyle. From beginning to end, it's about being immersed in a ton of activity with friends and family as well as any new folk you meet along the way. Whether you're looking to turn up to some good music or watch some provocative theater, our guide to just 14 cultural events happening in South Africa this December, has something for everyone.

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Photo by Lana Haroun

From #FeesMustFall to #BlueforSudan: OkayAfrica's Guide to a Decade of African Hashtag Activism

The 2010s saw protest movements across the continent embrace social media in their quest to make change.

The Internet and its persistent, attention-seeking child, Social Media has changed the way we live, think and interact on a daily basis. But as this decade comes to a close, we want to highlight the ways in which people have merged digital technology, social media and ingenuity to fight for change using one of the world's newest and most potent devices—the hashtag.

What used to simply be the "pound sign," the beginning of a tic-tac-toe game or what you'd have to enter when interacting with an automated telephone service, the hashtag has become a vital aspect of the digital sphere operating with both form and function. What began in 2007 as a metadata tag used to categorize and group content on social media, the term 'hashtag' has now grown to refer to memes (#GeraraHere), movements (#AmINext), events (#InsertFriendsWeddingHere) and is often used in everyday conversation ("That situation was hashtag awkward").

The power of the hashtag in the mobility of people and ideas truly came to light during the #ArabSpring, which began one year into the new decade. As Tunisia kicked off a revolution against oppressive regimes that spread throughout North Africa and the Middle East, Twitter, Instagram and Facebook played a crucial role in the development and progress of the movements. The hashtag, however, helped for activists, journalists and supporters of causes. It not only helped to source information quickly, but it also acted as a way to create a motto, a war cry, that could spread farther and faster than protestors own voices and faster than a broadcasted news cycle. As The Guardian wrote in 2016, "At times during 2011, the term Arab Spring became interchangeable with 'Twitter uprising' or 'Facebook revolution,' as global media tried to make sense of what was going on."

From there, the hashtag grew to be omnipresent in modern society. It has given us global news, as well as strong comedic relief and continues to play a crucial role in our lives. As the decade comes to a close, here are some of the most impactful hashtags from Africans and for Africans that used the medium well.

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