News Brief

Fuse ODG Teams Up with Ed Sheeran and Mugeez for 'Boa Me'—and It's Actually Good

Don't be surprised if you have this new track on repeat.

You can always count on Fuse ODG to push boundaries when it comes to taking afrobeats global.

The "Antenna" maestro just released a new track today, "Boa Me," in collaboration with Mugeez of R2Bees and Ed Sheeran.


Yes, Ed Sheeran.

The cynical and hypercritical side of me wants to be a hater—but the song is actually really good.

Take a listen via Spotify below. It's also available on Apple Music.

"Boa Me" has an effortless groove thanks to producer Killbeatz, and the trio really gel together. It's a track that's not by force.

The reactions to the song have been hilarious, especially when Ghanaians admit that Sheeran's Twi is better than their's.

Let me find out he too, also loves him some waakye.

We see you, Fuse ODG (and Ed). Can't wait to see what comes next.

Veteran South African Journalist Karima Brown Has Died

Tributes have been pouring in for journalist, political commentator and activist, Karima Brown, who has recently passed away from COVID-19.

Veteran South African journalist, political commentator and activist, Karima Brown has passed away. Brown had previously been admitted to hospital after contracting COVID-19 and was undergoing treatment over the past couple of weeks. Unfortunately, she lost her battle with the disease earlier this morning. Tributes have been pouring in from media colleagues, friends, politicians and ordinary South Africans since news of Brown's death emerged.

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News Brief
(Youtube)

Watch Davido Perform 'Assurance' & 'Jowo' On Jimmy Kimmel Live

The Nigerian superstar performed for the late night American TV show.

Davido stopped by Jimmy Kimmel Live last night to give viewers a lively performance.

Backed by a full band, the Nigerian superstar kicked things off by playing A Good Time single "Assurance," which will reportedly be featured in the Coming 2 America soundtrack. After a quick interlude and set change—a king's throne appeared onstage—Davido and his band went into a medley of "Jowo," his A Better Time single.

Davido's been busy this year as he recently shared the music video for A Better Time's "The Best" alongside Mayorkun, was featured in the remix of Focalistic's "Ke Star," and collaborated with Teni on "For You."

Watch Davido's Jimmy Kimmel live performance of "Assurance" and "Jowo (Medley) below.

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Still taken from 'Walking With Shadows film trailer'

Opinion: Nollywood & the Imminent Second Coming of Queer Cinema

An exploration of queer representation and misrepresentation in Nollywood, jaded stereotypes and what the future of queer cinema in Nollywood could look like.

In a scene from Daniel Orhiari's 2018 psychological thriller Sylvia, Richard (Chris Attoh) and Obaro (Udoka Oyeka) are friends casually catching up while drinking at a bar. When Richard tells him that he's in love with a woman he's just met and intends to marry her, Obaro is relieved and chuckles. ''I was beginning to wonder, you know, if you were gay or something,'' he says. While Richard looks incredulous and rejects the notion, the scene devolves into both a commentary and cautionary tale about married gay men in Lagos sleeping with their houseboys, reinforcing the idea that homosexuality is synonymous with paedophilia.

The homophobia in the scene becomes truly apparent when the bartender, having heard their conversation, slips his phone number towards Obaro after Richard leaves. Although Obaro had told his friend he has nothing against gay people, he shows disdain towards the bartender and flees the bar. Queer representation may be non-existent in Nollywood, but pockets of homophobia like this have showed up in the works of overzealous filmmakers, as shown in Ramsey Nouah's Living in Bondage: Breaking Free (2019) where the male protagonist was assumed to be gay after he indicated interest in a woman.

Nollywood is a microcosm of the larger virulently homophobic Nigerian society, but queer cinema had somewhat thrived around the early 2000's before flatlining into oblivion. This era followed the home video boom that began in the '90s, and was marked by slightly changing attitudes–or curiosity–about sex and sexuality. Soft pornography was consumed in the form of magazines (Hints) and other variants, glossy booklets with hardcore images were openly sold in shops, depicting women engaging in sexual acts with men or with themselves, and video porn was widely available in public spaces.

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ProVerb’s Memoir Is A Huge Slap In The Face To South African Hip-Hop

In his memoir, one of South Africa's revered lyricists ProVerb and his co-author compromise his rich story with trite motivational talk.