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Three Men Convicted In the Murder of 25-Year-Old Nigerian-British Model Harry Uzoka

Fellow model George Koh and two of his friends have been found guilty in the fatal stabbing of the rising model.

George Koh, a 24-year-old British model has been found guilty in the murder of Nigerian-British model Harry Uzoka.

Two other men Merse Dikanda, 24 and Jonathan Okigbo a personal trainer, also 24, have also been convicted for murder and manslaughter, respectively reports the BBC.

Uzoka was stabbed to death by Koh outside of his home in West London in January, in what the police initially believed was a "robbery gone wrong."


Koh denied that he intended to murder Uzoka in court, claiming that he carried two knives with him in self-defense because he was afraid that he would be beaten up by Uzoka and his friends. Koh's friend Dikanda, who was also found guilty of murder, had a machete on him during the incident.

According to a BBC report, Uzoka and Koh were friends in the modeling industry before their relationship soured. Prosecutors said that Koh had bragged to fellow model Annecetta Lafon that he had sex with Uzoka's girlfriend, fellow model Ruby Campbell, and the two decided to confront one another in person.

In a text message to Uzoka, shared in court, Koh wrote: "Where you I'll come there n we can fight bring ur friends with u." Uzoka then responded: "Come Shepherd's Bush."

Koh and friends made there way to Uzoka's apartment on January 11, where surveillance footage showed him being chased by the three men, reports People Magazine. Uzoka, who had brought a crowbar to the fight, was eventually stabbed three times and collapsed on a sidewalk near his apartment building.

Prosecutors argued that Koh, who modeled for Louis Vuitton, became increasingly jealous of Uzoka's success—the deceased model had just landed a major film role, and had modeled in major spreads for GQ and Zara.

The men will be sentenced on September 21.

A BBC news story entitled "Remembering Harry Uzoka," goes into detail about the late model's life and his many accomplishments within the fashion industry at such a young age, even helping Koh get his start in the modeling industry early on. The piece also reveals his dream of writing a film and creating a magazine celebrating black excellence.

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The Fugees' Concerts In Ghana & Nigeria Cancelled

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