Sports

George Weah's Son Scores Hat-trick for the US at U-17 World Cup

It prompts the question: if his dad becomes President of Liberia as he's likely to do, will Timothy Weah switch to playing for Liberia?

With his father, former AC Milan striker George Weah, set to run in the second round of the Liberian presidential election, Timothy Weah is proving himself worth of the Weah family name by excelling on the field at the under 17 World Cup. But the likely first-son of Liberia is not playing for his father's country—he's playing for the USA.

Born in New York City in 2000, the 17 year old American national has been signed to Paris Saint-Germain and with his incredible showing at this year's tournament is probably aiming for the club's first team.

According to the BBC

His second strike in particular, a brilliant curling effort from the edge box into the top corner, was reminiscent of his father - who scored a memorable solo goal for Milan against Verona in 1996.

Timothy Weah's father meanwhile, the 1995 Ballon d'Or winner an FIFA player of the year, is leading in Liberia's presidential first round. As of yesterday he was leading the pack of 20 candidates with 39 percent of the count and Liberia's current Vice President Joseph Boakai with 29 percent. As of yesterday, fewer that 5 percent of the country's polling stations had reported. A candidate must get over 50 percent of the total vote to win the presidency on the first round. With that looking unlikely a second round has been declared for November 7th.

If George Weah wins the Liberian election there are a lot of urgent issues he'll have to deal—the biggest one perhaps being the state of the country's various infrastructure networks as illustrated by a comment from his son yesterday.

As reported by ESPN, when Timothy Weah was asked whether his dad has heard the good news about his game he said:

"There isn't a lot of connectivity in Liberia so I couldn't text my father. I texted my mom. She told me to get down on my knees and thank God for scoring a hat trick and now focus on my next game."

Music

Adekunle Gold Teases Upcoming Album With New Single "Mercy"

The Nigerian afropop crooner has fans sitting in anticipation for his new album, due out February 4.

Afropop favorite Adekunle Gold is back on our minds with the announcement that his upcoming album Catch Me If You Can is out in a week! The Nigerian superstar has already teased fans with tracks "High" featuring Davido, "Sinner" featuring American singer Lucky Daye, and now shares his latest "Mercy."

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Music
Image courtesy of Spinall.

The 5 Songs You Need to Hear This Week

Featuring Spinall x Adekunle Gold, Ibibio Sound Machine, Turunesh and more

Every week, we highlight the top releases through our best music of the week column.

Here's our round up of the best tracks and music videos that came across our desks, which you can also check out in our Songs You Need to Hear This Week playlists on Spotify and Apple Music.

Follow our SONGS YOU NEED TO HEAR THIS WEEK playlist on Spotify here and Apple Music here.

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Film
Photo courtesy of Madelyn Bonilla

Madelyn Bonilla On Being The AfroLatina Representation Her Younger Self Needed

Bonilla, the founder of online community Brown Narrativ, spoke with us about how her experiences as an AfroLatina woman in NYC’s Bronx led her to write and direct her debut film, Pajón.

Madelyn Bonilla is dedicated to being the person she needed when she was growing up.

The former forensic science researcher-turned-advertising guru was born in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, and raised in the Bronx, New York - or, “where Hip-Hop was bred”, as the 36-year-old puts it. Growing up in a typically Latinx family, community, and neighborhood, Bonilla knew that there was so much more of herself to discover, as her interests in Black culture shaped a lot of her life. It wasn’t until her early 20s that she started to allow herself to explore her identity as an AfroLatina woman. The first to do so in her family, Bonilla faced – and still faces – scrutiny and shaming from the Latinx community at large, but also from her own loved ones. Comments like, “Your hair looks messy” or, “Your hair’s not combed” when Bonilla first began rocking her natural curls truly mirrored the thoughts and opinions of those around her, too. Her experiences as an AfroLatina woman are the experiences so many face, as they try to get to the root of their own roots.

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The Fugees' Concerts In Ghana & Nigeria Cancelled

Their entire reunion world tour "will not be able to happen [due to] the continued Covid pandemic."