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It's #RepublicDayBut... Ghanaians Tweet On The State Of The Nation

Ghanaians take to Twitter on Republic Day to air their frustrations on the state of the nation.


For two years in a row, Ghanaians are marking the Republic Day holiday on Twitter with a hashtag meant to jolt President John Mahama and his government into caring about the welfare of its citizens. Last year's #OccupyFlagStaff movement culminated in a peaceful demonstration in which a group of about 500 Ghanaian citizens decked in red and black gathered outside the front gates of President Mahama's residence and office. Momentum surrounding the protest fizzled out, though, and Ghanaians trudged on despite steadily worsening economic conditions.

This year, Ghanaians are banding together on Twitter to shed light on the precarious state of the economy 55 years since the election of Ghana's first president, Dr. Kwame Nkrumah, on July 1st 1960. Participants are using the hashtag #RepublicDayBut to vent their frustrations on topics that have been talking points among Ghanaians for the last few years, including the interminable Dumsor power outages, increases in fuel prices and utility tariffs, the depreciating value of the Ghanaian Cedi, and lack of job opportunities. The conversation today has also given rise to the hashtag #DearPrezMahama, which Ghanaians are using to directly address the president about his approach to governance.

Below, we take a look at what Ghanaians are saying about the state of the West African nation today.

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Photo Credit: Getty Images

Global Citizen x OkayAfrica: The Impact of Conflict on Children

An estimated 1.4 million children have been hit by schools closing in the Tigray region of Ethiopia amid conflict and crisis. Here's how that's impacting Ethiopia's children.

In times of conflict and war, school-aged children could have their futures defined by whether or not they can access education amid ongoing violence.

Ethiopia's northern region of Tigray is in the midst of a war that has impacted millions of lives and affected neighboring regions, Amhara and Afar. The war — which has forced citizens to flee, has tipped the region into famine, and has barricaded humanitarian aid from reaching the most vulnerable — has now been going on for about 11 months.

As the beginning of the school season draws nearer, safely reopening schools, making education accessible, and protecting children from the impacts of violence in the affected regions is a priority for aid agencies.

"As schools prepare to reopen in early October in most parts of the country, in Tigray and the bordering regions of Afar and Amhara, where the conflict has expanded, education remains at a standstill," Director of Education Cannot Wait, Yasmine Sherif, told Global Citizen.

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