popular
Photo by Reuben Silot (@reubensilot).

This Is What the Second Edition of the 'Hand-Forged in Kenya' Party Looked Like

It was another epic edition of our party in Nairobi featuring performances from Vallerie Muthoni, Bahati Bookings, Chris Kaiga and more.

OkayAfrica, Bateleur Brewery and The Alchemist Bar joined forces to launch a new live music series, Hand-Forged in Kenya, which is focused on showcasing rising Kenyan talent to fans, both locally and globally.

Curated by our Kenyan-based contributor Camille Storm, the long-awaited second edition took place on Saturday, August 10th at The Alchemist Bar in Nairobi.

Taio kicked off the night on the decks delivering a superb DJ set that got bodies moving on the dance floor almost immediately. By the time Bahati Bookings got on stage, the floor was packed with a curious audience. The budding music collective, consisting of artists Ekumbo, Baraka and DJ Supersun, had all eyes on them as they performed a groovy alternative hip-hop set.


Hand-Forged in Kenya: Vallerie Muthoni www.youtube.com

The crowd went wild once newcomer Chris Kaiga came on stage. The fast-rising rapper got the party really started his dance-ready genge-inspired set and the audience particularly couldn't wait for him to perform his breakout hit song "Zimenice" featuring Tezzla.

Singing sensation Vallerie Muthoni got on stage with her drummer to give an incredibly lively rendition of her Pisces SZN EP that came out earlier this year. One of the highlights was the music video premiere for her single "Spicy SZN" which features rising afro-jazz singer Le Ru and Taio Tripper. It was a beautiful moment when they all united on stage to perform the song while the video premiered on the screen.

Nairobi's finest DJ Mix Master Lenny finished off the night with an incredible set which was based on Kenyan music from different eras. Just like the debut edition, this party went on till the early morning hours.We definitely can't wait to see what the final edition of the year looks like.

All photography by Reuben Silot (@reubensilot).

popular
Photo by Simon Maina /AFP for Getty Images

'Chalk Back' Sees Kenyan Women Fighting Back Against Street Sexual Harassment

Kenyan women and girls in Kibera are using chalk to literally document their experiences with sexual harassment on the very streets they've been harassed.

Kenyan women and girls living in Kibera, one of the largest informal settlements on the continent, are fed up with being sexually harassed daily on the streets by men.

In a campaign dubbed "Chalk Back", women and young girls are using chalk to document their experiences with sexual harassment on the same streets they've been harassed, according to the BBC.

Keep reading... Show less
popular
Photo by Lana Haroun

From #FeesMustFall to #BlueforSudan: OkayAfrica's Guide to a Decade of African Hashtag Activism

The 2010s saw protest movements across the continent embrace social media in their quest to make change.

The Internet and its persistent, attention-seeking child, Social Media has changed the way we live, think and interact on a daily basis. But as this decade comes to a close, we want to highlight the ways in which people have merged digital technology, social media and ingenuity to fight for change using one of the world's newest and most potent devices—the hashtag.

What used to simply be the "pound sign," the beginning of a tic-tac-toe game or what you'd have to enter when interacting with an automated telephone service, the hashtag has become a vital aspect of the digital sphere operating with both form and function. What began in 2007 as a metadata tag used to categorize and group content on social media, the term 'hashtag' has now grown to refer to memes (#GeraraHere), movements (#AmINext), events (#InsertFriendsWeddingHere) and is often used in everyday conversation ("That situation was hashtag awkward").

The power of the hashtag in the mobility of people and ideas truly came to light during the #ArabSpring, which began one year into the new decade. As Tunisia kicked off a revolution against oppressive regimes that spread throughout North Africa and the Middle East, Twitter, Instagram and Facebook played a crucial role in the development and progress of the movements. The hashtag, however, helped for activists, journalists and supporters of causes. It not only helped to source information quickly, but it also acted as a way to create a motto, a war cry, that could spread farther and faster than protestors own voices and faster than a broadcasted news cycle. As The Guardian wrote in 2016, "At times during 2011, the term Arab Spring became interchangeable with 'Twitter uprising' or 'Facebook revolution,' as global media tried to make sense of what was going on."

From there, the hashtag grew to be omnipresent in modern society. It has given us global news, as well as strong comedic relief and continues to play a crucial role in our lives. As the decade comes to a close, here are some of the most impactful hashtags from Africans and for Africans that used the medium well.

Keep reading... Show less
Audio
Solo C.Plenty.Dreams cover artwork detail.

The 20 Best South African Hip-Hop Songs of 2019

Featuring Solo, Yanga Chief, Hanna, A-Reece, Indigo Stella, Shane Eagle, Priddy Ugly, Flame and many more.

The general notion is that South African hip-hop had a dull year. Maybe 2019 didn't have as many mega hip-hop hits from SA rappers, but it doesn't mean there weren't some great tunes.

2019 saw the new wave—featuring artists like Flame, The Big Hash, Indigo Stella, and more—dominate and demand every fan's attention. The older generation didn't sleep either, as strong songs from the likes of Solo and Stogie T make our list.

OkayAfrica contributors Sabelo Mkhabela and Mayuyuka Kaunda keep their ears to the street and sift through every release to bring you the 20 best South African hip-hop songs of 2019.

The list is in no particular order.

Follow our MZANSI HEAT playlist on Spotify here and Apple Music here.

Keep reading... Show less
popular
Ethiopia's Prime Minister and Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Abiy Ahmed Ali poses after being awarded with the Nobel Peace Prize during the Nobel Peace Prize ceremony 2018 at Oslo City Town Hall on December 10, 2019 in Oslo, Norway. (Photo by Erik Valestrand/Getty Images)

Ethiopia’s Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed Accepts Nobel Peace Prize Amidst Wave of Protest

The leader, who has been called a 'reformist' has been met with criticism from those who believe his efforts have not brought about tangible change.

Following the announcement of his win October, Ethiopia's Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed formally received his Nobel Peace Prize during the award ceremony in Oslo, Norway on Tuesday for his efforts to "achieve peace and international cooperation."

During his lecture, Ahmed addressed the ongoing quest for "peace," which he has been credited for fostering between Ethiopia and neighboring Eritrea following two decades of hostility between the two nations.

"For me, nurturing peace is like planting and growing trees," said Ahmed in his speech. "Just like trees need water and good soil to grow, peace requires unwavering commitment, infinite patience, and good will to cultivate and harvest its dividends." Ahmed was praised by chairperson of the Nobel Committee, Berit Reiss-Andersen, for representing a "new generation of African leaders who realise that conflict must be resolved by peaceful means."

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

news.

popular.