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Ibeyi Announce New Album and Share the Video for 'Deathless'

Ibeyi announce their upcoming album "Ash," and share their new music video for their single "Deathless," featuring Kamasi Washington.

French-Cuban duo, Ibeyi, return in a major way with the announcement of their upcoming  sophomore album, Ash, and a new music video for their Kamasi Washington-assisted single, "Deathless."


In "Deathless," Lisa-Kaindé and Naomi Díaz explore feelings of helplessness and hope, in response to Lisa-Kaindé being wrongfully arrested in France at the age of sixteen. Following the incident, the singer went home and penned the anthem.

"I was writing 'Deathless' as an anthem for everybody!"said the singer in a press release. "For every minority. For everybody that feels that they are nothing, that feels small, that feels not cared about and I want them to listen to our song and for three minutes feel large, powerful, deathless. I have a huge amount of respect for people who fought for, what I think, are my rights today and if we all sing together “we are deathless,” they will be living through us into a better world."

The song features jazz artist Kamasi Washington on the saxophone, and is the second single from their forthcoming album. The twins released its first single "Away Away" earlier this year.

Ash album artwork.

Ash will see Ibeyi sharing forward-looking songs that reflect on who they've grown to become as artists. "Ash is a more visceral and potent political statement, and while firmly rooted in Afro-Cuban culture and history, finds itself entirely concerned with Ibeyi’s present: Who Lisa-Kaindé and Naomi are, what’s important to them, and how they live today."

The album is due out on September 29, Ibeyi will embark on a tour following the album's release. Check out the dates below, as well as the full tracklist for Ash, and watch the Ed Morris-directed  music video for "Deathless" below.

Ash tracklist:

  1. I Carried This For Years
  2. Away Away
  3. Deathless feat. Kamasi Washington
  4. I Wanna Be Like You
  5. No Man Is Big Enough For My Arms
  6. Valé
  7. Waves
  8. Transmission/Michaelion feat. Meshell Ndegeocello
  9. Me Voy feat. Mala Rodriguez
  10. When Will I Learn feat. Chilly Gonzales
  11. Numb

Ibeyi 2017 tour dates:

9/30 Sannois, FR EMB

10/4 Feyzin, FR L’Épicerie Moderne

10/5 Strasbourg, FR La Laiterie

10/6 Lille, FR L’aéronef

10/11 Rennes, FR L’Étage

10/12 Nantes, FR Stéréolux

10/18 Bristol, UK Thekla

10/19 London, UK Shoreditch Town Hall

10/20 Manchester, UK Band On The Wall

10/28 Miami, FL North Beach Bandshell *

10/30 Atlanta, GA Variety Playhouse *

11/1 Washington D.C. 9:30 Club *

11/4 Philadelphia, PA Union Transfer *

11/5 Brooklyn, NY Brooklyn Steel *

11/6 Montreal, QC Corona Theatre *

11/7 Toronto, ON Phoenix Concert Hall *

11/9 Detroit, MI Magic Stick *

11/11 Minneapolis, MN Fine Line Music Café *

11/14 Seattle, WA Neptune Theatre *

11/15 Vancouver, BC The Commodore Ballroom *

11/16 Portland, OR Revolution Hall *

11/18 San Francisco, CA The Fillmore *

11/19 Los Angeles, CA Theatre at the Ace Hotel *

11/24 Paris, FR Casino de Paris (Festival Inrocks)

12/2 Cologne, DE Club Bahnhof Ehernfeld

12/3 Berlin, DE Lido

12/4 Hamburg, DE Knust

12/5 Amsterdam, NL Paradiso Noord

12/7 Leuven, BE Het Depot

*theMIND will open as support on all North American dates

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Pictures courtesy of Maeva Heim

Maeva Heim is the Founder the Beauty Industry Has Been Waiting on

The 31-year-old founder of Bread Beauty Supply is changing the conversation around haircare for textured hair.

It's nearing 9 p.m. in Australia, and Maeva Heim is dimly lit from behind and smiling warmly at her computer screen, ready to talk shop. We're here to discuss hair care, namely her brand Bread Beauty Supply, and how black beauty has made the globe smaller.

The 31-year-old is the founder of Bread Beauty Supply, a haircare line that encourages all textures and curl patterns to come as they are. "We don't want to tell you what to do with your hair. Enough people do that already," Heim says of Bread's brand philosophy. "We are just here to provide really good products for whatever you want to do with your hair at any point and not dictate to you how things should be. We're just women making the good products. You're making the good hair, and that's it. We're not here to define the rules."

But it's impossible to talk about recent strides in beauty products for textured hair without talking about the summer of 2020. In the weeks following the murder of George Floyd in the United States, a crescendo of cries rallied through global streets asking for not just equality but equity. The world watched with scrutiny as black boxes filled social feeds and brands made pledges to diversity. Those calls pinged from executive boards to the shelves of some of the world's largest beauty retailers. Meanwhile, after years of formulation, fundraising, and perfecting formulas and ingredients during a global pandemic, Maeva Heim introduced Bread beauty to the world in a perfect storm of timing and execution. The July 2020 launch filled a wide gap for Black beauty between homemade beauty products and behemoth beauty brands as Heim focused on an often under-explored direct-to-consumer middle.

Lauded on social media for their innovative packaging and nostalgic scents (the brand's award-winning hair oil smells like Froot Loops), Bread is a brand that makes hair care basics for not-so-basic hair. Typically, women with textured hair have not been included in the conversations around the idea of "'lazy girl hair" with minimal and effortless maintenance and styling - something Heim wanted to change. Part of Bread's mission is deleting category terms from the brand language – e.g. 'anti-frizz — that the brand feels unnecessarily demonizes characteristics that are natural to textured hair.

Photo courtesy of Bread Beauty

Born and raised in Peth, Western Australia, to an Ivorian mother and a French father, Heim grew up as one of the few Black kids in her neighborhood. Her days weaved between school and helping her mother run her braiding salon, one of the only of its kind in 1990's Australia. From sweeping floors, answering phones, and assisting with product orders, Heim's introduction to the world of beauty was rooted in the practice of doing.

Heim would go on to study business and law at Edith Cowan University in Western Australia, before working in marketing at L'Oréal, followed by an internship at Procter & Gamble in Singapore. But it wasn't until her relaxer exploded in her luggage during a flight between New York and Chicago that she began to think seriously about not only her personal hair journey but also about the beauty industry's gaps.

After ditching chemical hair-relaxer and returning to her natural texture, she pitched her idea to Sephora and, in 2019, was selected as one of the first-ever Australian participants in the Sephora Accelerate program, securing a launch deal for both in-store and online.

But what's most striking about Heim, aside from her penchant for focusing on the brand and the consumer, is her focus on the innovation gaps for Black beauty products. Uniquely shy on social media but poignantly focused on every nuance of her brand and serving Bread's prior overlooked customer base, Maeva is the founder the beauty world has been waiting for.

*This interview has been condensed and edited for length and clarity

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