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Ibeyi Announce New Album and Share the Video for 'Deathless'

Ibeyi announce their upcoming album "Ash," and share their new music video for their single "Deathless," featuring Kamasi Washington.

French-Cuban duo, Ibeyi, return in a major way with the announcement of their upcoming  sophomore album, Ash, and a new music video for their Kamasi Washington-assisted single, "Deathless."


In "Deathless," Lisa-Kaindé and Naomi Díaz explore feelings of helplessness and hope, in response to Lisa-Kaindé being wrongfully arrested in France at the age of sixteen. Following the incident, the singer went home and penned the anthem.

"I was writing 'Deathless' as an anthem for everybody!"said the singer in a press release. "For every minority. For everybody that feels that they are nothing, that feels small, that feels not cared about and I want them to listen to our song and for three minutes feel large, powerful, deathless. I have a huge amount of respect for people who fought for, what I think, are my rights today and if we all sing together “we are deathless,” they will be living through us into a better world."

The song features jazz artist Kamasi Washington on the saxophone, and is the second single from their forthcoming album. The twins released its first single "Away Away" earlier this year.

Ash album artwork.

Ash will see Ibeyi sharing forward-looking songs that reflect on who they've grown to become as artists. "Ash is a more visceral and potent political statement, and while firmly rooted in Afro-Cuban culture and history, finds itself entirely concerned with Ibeyi’s present: Who Lisa-Kaindé and Naomi are, what’s important to them, and how they live today."

The album is due out on September 29, Ibeyi will embark on a tour following the album's release. Check out the dates below, as well as the full tracklist for Ash, and watch the Ed Morris-directed  music video for "Deathless" below.

Ash tracklist:

  1. I Carried This For Years
  2. Away Away
  3. Deathless feat. Kamasi Washington
  4. I Wanna Be Like You
  5. No Man Is Big Enough For My Arms
  6. Valé
  7. Waves
  8. Transmission/Michaelion feat. Meshell Ndegeocello
  9. Me Voy feat. Mala Rodriguez
  10. When Will I Learn feat. Chilly Gonzales
  11. Numb

Ibeyi 2017 tour dates:

9/30 Sannois, FR EMB

10/4 Feyzin, FR L’Épicerie Moderne

10/5 Strasbourg, FR La Laiterie

10/6 Lille, FR L’aéronef

10/11 Rennes, FR L’Étage

10/12 Nantes, FR Stéréolux

10/18 Bristol, UK Thekla

10/19 London, UK Shoreditch Town Hall

10/20 Manchester, UK Band On The Wall

10/28 Miami, FL North Beach Bandshell *

10/30 Atlanta, GA Variety Playhouse *

11/1 Washington D.C. 9:30 Club *

11/4 Philadelphia, PA Union Transfer *

11/5 Brooklyn, NY Brooklyn Steel *

11/6 Montreal, QC Corona Theatre *

11/7 Toronto, ON Phoenix Concert Hall *

11/9 Detroit, MI Magic Stick *

11/11 Minneapolis, MN Fine Line Music Café *

11/14 Seattle, WA Neptune Theatre *

11/15 Vancouver, BC The Commodore Ballroom *

11/16 Portland, OR Revolution Hall *

11/18 San Francisco, CA The Fillmore *

11/19 Los Angeles, CA Theatre at the Ace Hotel *

11/24 Paris, FR Casino de Paris (Festival Inrocks)

12/2 Cologne, DE Club Bahnhof Ehernfeld

12/3 Berlin, DE Lido

12/4 Hamburg, DE Knust

12/5 Amsterdam, NL Paradiso Noord

12/7 Leuven, BE Het Depot

*theMIND will open as support on all North American dates

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