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Listen to Ibibio Sound Machine's New Album 'Doko Mien'

A blend of electronic sounds and '70s West African disco.

Ibibio Sound Machine are back with their latest album, Doko Mien.

The UK-based group, fronted by Nigerian singer Eno Williams, expertly blend electronic sounds with West African influences, taking cues from '70s West African disco.

They just dropped their latest single, "Wanna Come Down," which the band describes as an "infectious jam from the album that mixes disco, '80s electro with English and Ibibio language lyrics." Doko Mien, the title of the group's new album. means "tell me" in Ibibio.

"Music is a universal language, but spoken language can help you think about what makes you emotional, what makes you feel certain feelings, what you want to see in the world," mentions Eno Williams.

Listen to Doko Mien below and catch Ibibio Sound Machine on their North American tour (dates below).


Ibibio Sound Machine - Wanna Come Down (Official Music Video) youtu.be




TOUR DATES

May 04 Leeds, UK - Live at Leeds

May 05 Leicester, UK - Handmade Festival

May 24 London, UK - All Points East Festival

Jul 12 Birmingham, UK - Mostly Jazz Festival

Jul 13 Reading, UK - Readipop Festival

Jul 18 Cheshire, UK - Bluedot Festival

Jul 25 New York, NY - Brooklyn Bowl

Jul 26 Washington, DC - U Street Music Hall

Jul 27 Carrboro, NC - Cat's Cradle (MRG30)

Jul 30 Los Angeles, CA - The Moroccan Lounge

Jul 31 Oakland, CA - The New Parish

Aug 1-3 Happy Valley, OR - Pickathon

Aug 7 Newquay, UK - Boardmasters Festival

Sep 28 Portsmouth, UK - Wedgewood Rooms

Oct 01 Guildford, UK - Boileroom

Oct 05 Nottingham, UK - Rescue Rooms

Oct 07 Norwich, UK - Norwich Arts Centre

Oct 08 Newcastle, UK - Riverside

Oct 09 Glasgow, UK - Classic Grand

Oct 10 Liverpool, UK - Invisible Wind Factory

Oct 11 Sheffield, UK - O2 Academy 2

Oct 15 Cardiff, UK - Plas

Oct 16 Exeter, UK - Exeter Phoenix

Oct 17 Aldershot, UK - West End Centre

Oct 18 Birmingham, UK - Hare and Hounds

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Photo by Don Paulsen/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Hugh Masekela's New York City Legacy

A look back at the South African legend's time in New York City and his enduring presence in the Big Apple.

In Questlove's magnificent documentary, Summer of Soul, he captures a forgotten part of Black American music history. But in telling the tale of the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival, the longtime musician and first-time filmmaker also captures a part of lost South African music history too.

Among the line-up of blossoming all-stars who played the Harlem festival, from a 19-year-old Stevie Wonder to a transcendent Mavis Staples, was a young Hugh Masekela. 30 years old at the time, he was riding the wave of success that came from releasing Grazing in the Grass the year before. To watch Masekela in that moment on that stage is to see him at the height of his time in New York City — a firecracker musician who entertained his audiences as much as he educated them about the political situation in his home country of South Africa.

The legacy Masekela sowed in New York City during the 1960s remains in the walls of the venues where he played, and in the dust of those that are no longer standing. It's in the records he made in studios and jazz clubs, and on the Manhattan streets where he once posed with a giant stuffed zebra for an album cover. It's a legacy that still lives on in tangible form, too, in the Hugh Masekela Heritage Scholarship at the Manhattan School of Music.

The school is the place where Masekela received his education and met some of the people that would go on to be life-long bandmates and friends, from Larry Willis (who, as the story goes, Masekela convinced to give up opera for piano) to Morris Goldberg, Herbie Hancock and Stewart Levine, "his brother and musical compadre," as Mabusha Masekela, Bra Hugh's nephew says.

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