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Photo: Mídia NINJA

Iconic Samba School to Pay Tribute to Late Afro-Brazilian Activist, Marielle Franco, at Carnival

Plus, a new documentary from The Guardian seeks answers in the details surrounding her death.

One of Brazil's most iconic samba schools will pay homage to the late Afro-Brazilian activist and councilwoman Marielle Franco at this year's carnival, reports The Rio Times.

'Estação Primeiro de Mangueira' (First Station of Mangueira), have announced that this year, their production will honor Franco and her profound legacy of working to bring about racial justice for black people living in the country's favelas. The school will produce an original song that pays tribute to her.

Rio de Janeiro Has Named March 14th 'Marielle Franco Day—Against the Genocide of Black Women'

Last year's carnival champions, the 'Paraíso do Tuiuti' Samba School, also addressed issues of race, according to The Rio Times. They won for their work on the lasting legacy of slavery.

Samba schools were hit with funding cuts in 2018 according to a report from the BBC, but that did not stop groups from producing show-stopping, politically-relevant works.

This dedication to the tradition of art and storytelling at carnival—even in the face of immense odds—has carried on into 2019, as this year the country is faced with the far-right, anti-black leadership of Jair Bolsonaro.

The Seeds of Marielle: These Courageous Afro-Brazilian Women Are Running for State Office Despite the Odds

Writer Kiratiana Freelon wrote about the harmful implications of his leadership, following the murder of capoeira master and advocate for Afro-Brazilians Mestre Moa de Katendê by one of his supporters. While David A. Wilson writes extensively about racial dynamics and the new movements that are rising to help transform them in "The Assassination of Marielle Franco and the Dawn of Brazil's New Civil Rights Movement."

A new documentary from The Gaurdian follows Franco's widow Monica Benicio as she looks for answers in the death of her partner, while also battling the political tensions brought on by Bolsonaro's presidency. You can watch it here.

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Image courtesy of Érica Malanguinho.

The Seeds of Marielle: These Courageous Afro-Brazilian Women Are Running for State Office Despite the Odds

Here are 11 of the inspirational black women running for political office in Brazil's upcoming national elections.

Marielle Franco, 38, a black politician from Rio de Janeiro, died fighting for the rights of women and favela dwellers. On March 14 armed men gunned the councilwoman down in her car in the center of Rio de Janeiro with nine shots—four to the head.

Her assassination hit black women hard.

As a councilwoman from the Maré favela, she denounced the police brutality that favela residents, most of them black, regularly experienced. Many black women felt it was a direct attack on the potential of black women to ascend to power in politics. But her assassination came at a unique time—six months before Brazil's state and national elections. After Marielle's death, black women felt empowered to run for political office and in this year's elections, black women candidates are more visible than ever. These women are now collectively called the "Sementes de Marielle"—the seeds of Marielle.

The national elections take place on October 7. There are 231 black women running for political office in the state of Rio de Janeiro—almost twice the 2014 number (125). They are running for governor, deputy federal and state deputy. This should come as no surprise, black women make up 27 percent of Brazil—the largest group. The candidates represent the diversity of black women in Brazil. They are evangelical. They follow Afro-Brazilian religions. Some are from favelas. Some grew as middle class. Some are college-educated.

Below is a sampling of the seeds of Marielle.

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Photo: Mídia NINJA

Rio de Janeiro Has Named March 14th 'Marielle Franco Day—Against the Genocide of Black Women'

The day will be used to promote community wide reflection on the killings of black women.

Following the targeted assassination of Afro-Brazilian human rights activist and city council member Marielle Franco this past March, the governor of Rio de Janeiro, Luiz Fernando Pezão, has named March 14th, the date of Franco's untimely death, "Marielle Franco Day—a day against the genocide of black women" in Rio de Janeiro, reports The Rio Times.

The ordinance states that the day be used to promote community-wide discussion and reflection on the killings of black women in Brazil through lectures and public debates.

"To have March 14th as a date that saves and revives Marielle Franco's struggle for the lives of black, poor, favela and peripheral women is very important and symbolic," Renata Souza, Franco's former Chief of Staff told O Globo.

"It is urgent that black women be the focus of public policies because they are the main victims of the lack of state assistance. Therefore, it is these black women who in the last ten years have the highest rates of feminicide when they are murdered by their spouses in abusive relationships," she added.

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Stogie T’s Visuals for ‘Love & War’ Use Contrasting Colors to Explore the Complexity of Heroism

Stogie T shares polarizing visuals for 'Love & War.'

A few months ago, Stogie T highlighted the song "Love & War" as a single from his latest EP The Empire of Sheep, released in November 2019. After releasing a deluxe version of the project last week, today the south African emcee shares a music video for "Love & War," which features the emerging vocalist Lucille Slade.

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Photo by Michael Tullberg/Getty Images

Black Coffee’s ‘Africa Is Not A Jungle’ Showcase Lockdown Edition Will be Hosted Online Every Week

Black Coffee's 'Africa Is Not A Jungle' showcase goes online amid the lockdown.

With festivals, concerts and events around the world having been postponed and cancelled due to the Covid-19 outbreak, Black Coffee's company Soulistic Agency will be presenting a Lockdown edition of Africa Is Not A Jungle. A Is Not A Jungle is the South African house music superstar's tour which had dates across South Africa and other parts of the continent—Lesotho, Mozambique, Angola and Uganda. The tour was put on hold in March soon after President Cyril Ramaphosa banned social gatherings of more than 100 people.

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