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Ilhan Omar Photo vis Wikimedia

Ilhan Omar is Running for Congress and the Alt Right is Trying to Sabotage Her

The first Somali-American legislator had her event with Rashida Tlaib interrupted by anti-Muslim activists including the Laura Loomer.

Last year we wrote about how Ilhan Omar defeated the longest-serving member of the Minnesota House to become representative for Minnesota's District 60B. In the process, she managed to increase youth voter turnout in her district by 37 percent. Now she's taking that youthful momentum to the national stage, running for the congressional seat vacated by Keith Ellison.


Born in Somalia and raised partially in a Kenyan refugee camp, Omar is running on a progressive platform and claims she will bring the voice of refugees to Washington. She has been endorsed by rising-star-of-the-left Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and supports popular policies like medicare for all and cancelling student loan debt.

Ellison, the first Muslim in Congress, also found electoral success in the district as an advocate for progressive politics, although his campaign for Attorney General has been disrupted by recent allegations from a former girlfriend of physical and mental abuse.

Local news is reporting that primary voting is heavy—typically a sign of change.

Here she is telling Minnesota Public Radio on why she's running for Congress.

Over the weekend, Omar and another midwestern Democratic rising star, Rashida Tlaib, were accosted by islamophobic alt-right activists at a campaign event at Minneapolis' Holy Land deli where their speeches were interrupted by shouting about racist tropes like "sharia law" and "support for Hamas." In response, the crowd of supporters chanted "Time for Ilhan."

The Minnesota primary results will be available later tonight.

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Photo by Giles Clarke/UNOCHA via Getty Images

Cameroon Holds Vigil to Remember Children Killed in School Attack

Residents in Kumba paid their respects to the seven lives lost, and those injured during the attack over the weekend.

In the latest tragedy to come from Cameroon's historically violent clash between Anglo and Francophone citizens, seven children were murdered after attackers stormed a school with guns and machetes over the weekend.

In what has been deemed as the "darkest and saddest day," by Bishop Agapitus Nfon of Kumba, armed attackers stormed the Mother Francisca International Bilingual Academy, targeting students aged 9 to 12. The tragic event saw dozens of children injured, some critically.

The attack has shocked the nation, with both local and international agencies condemning the horrible offense. On Monday, Cameroonian President Paul Biya denounced the "horrific murder" of the school children, and alluded to the "appropriate measures" being taken in order to bring justice to the families of the victims. Prime Minister Dion Ngute Joseph shared his condolences via a tweet saying, "I bow before the memory of these innocent kids."

The Cameroonian presidency and governing body have blamed Anglophone 'separatists' for the attack, though the group claims no part in the attack.

Human rights groups, however, have blamed both opposing parties, as the conflict has led to the death of over 3,000 deaths and resulted in more than 700,000 Cameroonians fleeing their homes and the country.

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Interview: Meet Velemseni, Eswatini’s Queen of Soul

Soul artist Velemseni's music reflects Eswatini culture and aesthetics. "The Kingdom of Eswatini is a magical and mysterious place, and my music aims to interpret and document that mystique, drawing from genres like Swazi gospel, soul, African soul, cinematic and traditional music," says the artist.