Popular
Photo: Sabelo Mkhabela

South Africa Legalizes Marijuana—Smokers Rejoice​

The country's constitutional court announced today that dagga AKA ganja AKA weed AKA canibus can now be legally consumed in private places in South Africa.

Last year as Lesotho began growing weed for medical and research purposes we asked what would marijuana legalization look like in South Africa? Speculate no longer.


This morning South Africa's Constitutional Court declared the law criminalizing the use of weed unconstitutional and invalid, giving the government 24 months to come up with new ones that respected South Africans' right to privacy "in their private spheres." While it will "not be a criminal offence for an adult person to use or be in possession of cannabis in private for his or her personal consumption,"the BBC reports, it would still not be legal to use the drug in public, to sell it or supply it. Prior to the ruling, possession of marijuana in South Africa could earn you up to 15 years in prison and up to 25 years for dealing the substance.

Countries and jurisdictions across the globe have been moving toward legalizing consumption of marijuana, often pointing out the substance's relative lack of danger compared to alcohol and tobacco and, especially in the United States, the unequal application of laws related to is criminalization.

LISTEN: 11 South African Hip-Hop Songs About Weed

As cheekily reported in News24:

This is a joint victory for Dagga Party leader Jeremy Acton and Rastafarian Garreth Prince who argued on December 13 and 14, 2016, for the decriminalisation of the herb.

South African Rastafarians showed out for the announcement. As did a wide range of legalization activists who lit up joints outside the court. As expected, the news has overwhelmed discussion on South African social media with discussion ranging from the serious to the silly.










Interview
Photo: Benoit Peverelli

Interview: Oumou Sangaré Proves Why She's the Songbird of Wassoulou

We caught up with the Malian singer to talk about her new Acoustic album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

When Oumou Sangaré tells me freedom is at her core, I am not surprised. If you listen to her discography, you'll be hard-pressed to find a song that doesn't center or in some way touch on women's rights or child abuse. The Grammy award-winning Malian singer has spent a significant part of her career using her voice to fight for the rights of women across Africa and the world, a testimony to this is her naming her debut studio album Moussolou, meaning Woman. The album, a pure masterpiece that solidified Oumou's place amongst the greats and earned her the name 'Songbird of Wassoulou,' was a commercial success selling over 250,000 records in Africa and would in turn go on to inspire other singers across the world.

On her latest body of work Acoustic, a reworking of her critically acclaimed 2017 album Mogoya, Oumou Sangaré proves how and why she earned her accolades. The entirety of the 11-track album was recorded within two days in the Midi Live studio in Villetaneuse in 'live' conditions—with no amplification, no retakes or overdubs, no headphones. Throughout the album, using her powerful and raw voice that has come to define feminism in Africa and shaped opinions across the continent, Oumou boldly addresses themes like loss, polygamy and female circumcision.

We caught up with the Malian singer at the studio she is staying while in quarantine to talk about her new album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

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