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First Listen: This All-Female South African EP Explores Love in All Forms

Jackie Queens gathers women musicians for this Women's Month special compilation.

SOUTH AFRICA–South African-based, Zimbabwean-born singer Jackie Queens believes in collaboration.


For her latest compilation, the 4-track GIRLS 2: The Love EP, she gathered Cape Town up-and-coming musicians such as Deslynn Malotana, Shannon Devy, Lana Crowster and Andy Mkosi for a soulful exploration of love in all its forms.

“This EP was a challenge to myself,” says Jackie. “To see how many wonderful women I could bring together in the spirit of collaboration and sisterhood. Often the perception is that women artists are competitive and divided. My reality is very different. I belong to a musical community where we cheer each other on and show up for our sisters in real life.”

The project, which was recorded at Red Bull Studios in Cape Town, includes diverse production from the likes of Muzi, Omak, Avenging Wind and Luka, which ranges from house, to electro, hip-hop and jazz, among other genres.

GIRLS 2: The Love EP is a follow-up to a song called “Girls,” which Jackie Queens released last year on Women’s Day. The song featured singers Deslynn Malotana and Bonj Mpanza, and thematically dealt with the realities of being a woman.

Jackie Queens is hoping this project will be annual, and, in the long run, will see her touring and performing with all the artists who contributed.

Listen to GIRLS 2: The Love EP below, and follow Jackie Queens on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Photo by Meztli Yoalli Rodríguez

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