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Jidenna: "It's Nigeria's Moment, It's Africa's Moment"

Jidenna told CNN that it's Nigeria's moment in music right now and revealed that he's been in the studio with Wizkid.

It's no news that Nigerian sounds from the likes of Wizkid, Ayo Jay and others are showing their impact on charts across the globe.


To give his two cents on the matter, Jidenna recently spoke to CNN and shared his thoughts on the current musical climate. He also revealed that he's been in the studio with Wizkid.

"I think it's Nigeria's moment, it's Africa's moment," he tells CNN. "I think Nigeria is a spearhead because Nigerians seem to be charged full of character so people are eating it up all across the world."

"You've seen Alicia Keys and Swizz Beats [sic] and Drake, Chris Brown, Party Next Door... listening to Afrobeats as well. I wanted to see [if] in the US, I can get a song on the radio that actually has pidgin in it? And I did it," he mentions.

A photo posted by Jidenna (@jidenna) on

"That's the beautiful thing... [my album] you can dance and shoki to it, in the larger context my album blends the different worlds that I've lived in."

"I've already been in the studio with Wizkid," he also added, "I have plans to be in the studio with everyone I consider a bridge builder, the Davido's, the Tiwa Savage's, I love Flavour's music, my fellow Igbo brother. So I would love to connect with everybody."

If you remember, back in September, Jidenna visited his childhood home in Nigeria and launched a scholarship at Enugu State University.

Read the full interview, in which Jidenna also goes into his controversy over kidnapping comments and his father's legacy, over at CNN.

 

Audio
(Youtube)

7 Gengetone Acts You Need to Check Out

The streets speak gengetone: Kenya's gengetone sound is reverberating across East Africa and the world, get to know its main purveyors.

Sailors' "Wamlambez!"Wamlambez!" which roughly translates to "those who lick," is the cry the reverberated round the world, pushing the gengetone sound to the global stage. The response "wamnyonyez" roughly translates to "those who suck" and that should tell you all you need to know about the genre.

Known for its lewd lyrics and repetitive (often call and response) hooks, gengetone makes no apologies for belonging to the streets. First of all, most artists that create gengetone are grouped into bands with a few outliers like Zzero Sufuri riding solo. The songs themselves often feature a multiplicity of voices with screams and crowds coming through as ad libs, adding to this idea that this is definitely "outside" music.

Listening to Odi wa Muranga play with his vocal on the track "Thao" it's easy to think that this is the first, but gengetone fits snuggly in a history of sheng rap based on the kapuka style beat. Kapuka is onomatopoeically named, the beats have that repetitive drum-hat-drum skip that sounds like pu-ka-pu-ka-pu. Artists like Nonini were asking women to come over using this riff long before Ochungulo family told them to stay home if they aren't willing to give it up.

Here's seven gengetone groups worth listening to.

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