#Okay100Women

JOJO ABOT

OkayAfrica's 100 Women celebrates African women who are making waves, shattering ceilings, and uplifting their communities.

Hailing from Accra, Ghana, Jojo Abot is an accomplished artist who experiments with different genres including, electronica, afrobeat, jazz, neo-soul, house and reggae.


Abot also uses photography, literature and performance art to showcase her talent. Fyfya Woto, is the singer-songwriter's EP which talks about a woman’s right to choose and tells the story of “a young, Anlo (Ghanaian) woman hungry to be loved...Caught in a compromising situation with her Caucasian lover in a time of slavery and divide, she is brought before a tribunal at which she must save not only herself but also her lover.” The themes that come through include duty, love, family, freedom and tradition, to name a few.

Abot is scheduled to go on tour with Lauryn Hill later this year and has made a name for herself as a passionate performer who has graced the Summer Stage and Global Citizen platforms.

The Ghanaian creates work from Accra, New York City and Copenhagen.

-JO

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Photo Courtesy of Uzo Aduba

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Two of the women from our 2017 list, Nigerian actor, writer and comedian Yvonne Orji and her fellow Naija sister—writer, speaker and social critic Luvvie Ajayi—took the time out to share a special message of encouragement to the new honorees.

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Stormzy is readying the release of his second album, Heavy Is the Head, due December 13.

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(Photo credit should read PIUS UTOMI EKPEI/AFP via Getty Images)

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