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Tributes Pour Out for Legendary Kenyan Musician Joseph Kamaru

The celebrated Kikuyu singer passed away on Wednesday after battling Parkinson's Disease.

Tributes and condolences are rolling in for celebrated Kenyan musician, Joseph Kamaru, who passed On Wednesday following a battle with Parkinson's Disease. He was 79.

"He was diagnosed with Parkinson plus, a nerve disease which we believe is the main cause of his death," said that artists's son Stephen Maina. "But we thank God for giving him to us,"

The popular Benga and gospel singer, known for singing in the Kikuyu language, delivered hit songs such as "Tiga Kuhenia Igoti (Don't Lie to the Court)" which tackled sexual harassment, as well as other socially and politically charged songs like "Gathoni" and "Charia Ungi."


Born in 1939, Kamaru had a career spanning several decades, beginning his singing career in 1959 and recording his breakout song "Celina" in 1967. He recorded over 2,000 songs throughout his extensive career, many of which addressed morality and governmental leadership.

Kenya's President Uhuru Kenyatta, released a statement in honor of the artists this morning, stating that his loss is a major blow to the country. "It was a blessing for us as a country to have had such a talented artiste who played a big role in promoting the Kenyan brand of music," said the president. "Indeed we will miss his educative music which was unique in many aspects."

Several leaders, artists fans and supporters have shared heartfelt messages on social media in remembrance of the musician.











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(Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

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