Audio

NYC: Just A Band and Stew & The Negro Problem Live at Weeksville Heritage Center [7/28]


Weeksville Heritage Center's Garden Party series comes to a close this Saturday, July 29th with performances from Kenya's Just A Band and Stew & The Negro Problem.  This is certainly is one you won't want to miss if you're in Brooklyn!

Just A Band will be bringing their wildly eclectic sound, which draws as much from house and disco as it does from soul and hip-hop. If you're not familiar (you should be!) check out some of their tunes and their excellent Earbuds mixtape.

Stew & The Negro Problem garnered a lot of attention for their semi-autobiographical, Tony-nominated musical Passing Strange (which was also filmed by Spike Lee for a DVD release - Holla at Netflix!).  Stew, born Mark Stewart, and his musical partner in crime, Heidi Rodewald, will release their new album, Making It, later this year.

Weeksville Heritage Center is located at 1698 Bergen Street in Brooklyn, NY.

*AFTERPARTY! Join us after Weeksville for an afterparty at NuBlu with a DJ set by Just A Band! [NuBlu 62 Avenue C (bet. 4th and 5th streets) 9PM - 11PM]

Interview
Photo: Lex Ash (@thelexash). Courtesy of Simi.

Interview: Simi Is Taking Risks

Nigerian star Simi talks about the successes & risks of this year, her thoughts on the #EndSARS protests, and how her husband, Adekunle Gold, inspired Restless II.

Simi is restless. It has nothing to do with the year she has had, in fact, she reaffirmed her status as one of Nigeria's most successful musicians with a single music drop, "Duduke," which enjoyed widespread appeal as the nation went into lockdown earlier in the year.

The 32-year-old singer's restlessness is a reflection of the organised chaos that has defined her recording process this year as she combined the rigours of being an expectant mother with an examination of her place in the wider world. It, more accurately, reflects her re-negotiation of the parameters of her stardom.

"I've never really been a big fan of the spotlight," she whispers silently early in our Zoom conversation. "I know that it comes with the territory, but when I got my big break and more people started to recognise me, I realised that I had to edit myself, my life, and most of the things that I'd do or say because I wanted to be careful to keep a part of me for myself."

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