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Kenyans Rejoice as the Remains of Omieri, the Legendary Snake and Goddess of Harvest, Return Home

The giant python was believed to protect the well-being of the Luo people—its return is kind of a big deal.

Thirty years after its death, the Kenyan government plans to return the remains of a fabled snake named Omieri back to its original home in Kisumu County, Kenya. The news has been met with immense joy from the area's residents for a number of reasons.

The main one being that Omieri was no ordinary snake.

The 16-foot python, which was said to be the biggest ever seen in the area, was known to perform miracles which helped protect the well-being of the Luo people. Omieri was worshiped by members of the community who believed the snake brought good fortune. The snake was of major cultural and religious significance in the region. According to Standard Digital Kenya, the python was considered the goddess of rain and bumper harvests.


Its death in 1987, due to injuries it sustained in a wildfire, was highly-publicized and caused many Kenyans to deeply mourn its loss. Upon its death, Ojwang' Kombudo a Kenyan MP representing Nyakach, demanded the government return its remains to the area instead of taking them to Nairobi, as he believed that the snake's absence was the cause of the season's harvest failure.

Members of the Luo community have been anxiously awaiting the snakes return, and the news of The National Museums of Kenya's plan to transport Omieri's delicate remains back to Nyanza for a five-day cultural event, has been met with jubilation. The event is being organized by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO).

"A lot of miracles used to happen whenever Omieri appeared and our people never went hungry whenever it appeared," said Nyandiko Ongadi, one of the elders of the Luo Council of Elders. Since Omieri died, we have never seen such a miracle, its return is a blessing even though it is dead," he added.

Omieri's remains are currently held at the National Museum in Nairobi as a national artifact, but Ongadi believes they should be permanently brought back to Kisumu County, where it has strong cultural ties.

This event is no small deal. Leaders of the community will hold a traditional ceremony to mark the mystical python's return.

(Photo by Gareth Cattermole/Getty Images)

The 10 Best HHP Songs Ranked

On the second anniversary of HHP's passing, we rank 10 of the South African hip-hop legend's best songs.

Jabulani Tsambo, popularly known by his alias HHP, was a pivotal part of South African hip-hop. Renowned for trailblazing the motswako sub-genre in the early 2000s, the rapper sadly passed away on October 24th, 2018 after a long and much publicised bout with depression.

During his active years, which span two decades (from 1997 to 2018), he was instrumental in breaking barriers and bridging the gap between kwaito and hip-hop in SA, from the late 90s to early 2000s.

He became a household name in the 2000s as he spearheaded the motswako movement, propelling it to the mainstream and solidifying his legendary status in the process.

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Photo: Leon Neal/Getty Images

How You Can Help Nigeria’s #EndSARS Protests

We round up some ways you can support the movement and its cause, no matter where you are in the world.

Widespread protests against Nigeria's notorious Special Anti-Robbery Squad (SARS) are becoming more of a revolution. The movement is an outcry from youths demanding a general reform of the country, majorly characterized by poor governance, with a focus on the harassment and assaults committed by SARS. The movement has been raging through the city of Lagos for the past three weeks, as protesters home and abroad have taken to the streets in masses to express their keen dissatisfaction.

Hashtags like #EndSARS, #EndPoliceBrutality, and #EndBadGovernanceInNigeria have brandished across all social media platforms to amplify the voices of the youth people fighting back. These hashtags have, in turn, gained traction with the help of celebrities like singers Rihanna, Demi Lovato, and Beyoncé, Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey, and many others. Nigerian stars, Falz, Runtown, Tiwa Savage, Davido, Wizkid, Burna Boy, and many more also joined in the movement, as many of them took to the streets with placards.

To date, the peacefully protesting Nigerians' needs have not been met. With said needs not being satisfied as they demand justice for lives lost due to the brutal and corrupt practices of police officers.

We have rounded up some ways you can support this movement and its cause, no matter where you are in the world.

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The 8 Songs You Need to Hear This Week

Featuring Simmy, Made Kuti, Shane Eagle, Emel Mathlouthi, Amaarae and more.

Every week, we highlight the cream of the crop in music through our best music of the week column.

Here's our round up of the best tracks and music videos that came across our desks, which you can also check out in our Songs You Need to Hear This Week playlists on Spotify and Apple Music.

Follow our SONGS YOU NEED TO HEAR THIS WEEK playlist on Spotify here and Apple Music here.

Check out all of OkayAfrica's playlists on Spotify and Apple Music.

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