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Kenyans Can Now Screen 'RAFIKI' for 7 Days, Making It Eligible for Oscars Bid

High Court Judge Wilfrida Okwany says she was "not convinced that Kenya is such a weak society that its moral foundation will be shaken by seeing such a film."

Wanuri Kahiu's RAFIKI is finally coming home.

The High Court has temporarily lifted the ban the Kenya Film Classification Board imposed to make way for an Oscars bid, Business Daily Africa reports. Kahiu recently sued the board and its head Ezekiel Mutua over the ban.


The film will be free to screen in theaters for seven days to "willing adults," allowing Kahiu and producers to fulfill the necessary requirements to submit it to the Academy as a nominee for the Best Foreign Language Film, The Washington Post adds.

"I am crying," Kahiu tweets. "In a French airport. In SUCH Joy! Our constitution is STRONG! Give thanks to freedom on expression!!!! WE DID IT!"

Judge Wilfrida Okwany says in her ruling Friday that she was "not convinced that Kenya is such a weak society that its moral foundation will be shaken by seeing such a film." She also cited Kenyan artists who've had to flee the country and seek asylum because their work "went against the grain of societal expectations."

The Film Board released a statement, saying it would comply with the court orders, Buzzfeed News' Tamerra Griffin reports, but adds that "it is a sad moment, not only to the film industry, but to all Kenyans who stand for morality, that a film that glorifies homosexuality is allowed to be the country's branding tool abroad."

As Mutua and his board continues to stew in the enemy of progress pot, RAFIKI is set to screen at Prestige Cinema at Prestige Plaza from September 23 to 29 at the following times:

Sunday | 10:00 am

Monday/Tuesday | 1:15 pm

Wednesday/Thursday | 3:15 pm

Friday/Saturday | 12:50 pm

ICYMI: Listen To the Female Musician-Led Soundtrack of Wanuri Kahiu's 'RAFIKI'

Photo courtesy of @sahraisha

#BlackOutEid​: Young Black Muslims Shine as They Celebrate Eid

Young Black Muslims have found creative ways to celebrate community and share their best Eid looks, even as they #StayAtHome.

Eid Mubarak to our Muslim fam! Today marks Eid al-Fitr, the official end of the Holy Month of Ramadan.

Despite things being a little different this year (on account of the current pandemic, of course) this hasn't stopped many from finding creative ways to fast, pray and connect with their community during these times. It certainly hasn't stopped young Black Muslims from participating in the virtual tradition known as #BlackOutEid while they continue to #StayAtHome.

#BlackOutEid is an annual celebration which highlights the diversity within the Muslim world. It began in 2015, when Aamina Mohamed created the hashtag to combat the erasure of Black people within the community. Since then, the hashtag has been used across social media with Black Muslims using it to share their sharpest Eid looks.

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Rebuilding the Nigerian Fashion Industry After Coronavirus

While the style capital of Africa remains shuttered, Nigerian fashion insiders have an ambitious plan to forge an independent path in a post-COVID world.

Like most Zoom calls, the first digital edition of Woven Threads began with a headcount confirming whose mic was on, who was online at the moment and who was trying to join in.

The two-hour live session included the founder of Lagos Fashion Week Omoyemi Akerele, founder and CRO of Ruff n Tumble Nike Ogunlesi, special adviser to the Nigerian president on Ease of Doing Business Jumoke Oduwole and several other fashion professionals in a conversation on how African fashion can adapt to a fast-changing world of ruptured supply chains and cheap foreign textiles.

Like in previous years, Woven Threads was actually meant to take place in real life with a series of workshops and interactive sessions as well as a pop-up store. Normally the event is a big deal, signifying the opening of the first of Nigeria's two fashion seasons. This year it signified an industry determined to change in the face of the global coronavirus pandemic.

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Image courtesy of Melanin Unscripted.

Alton Mason's Lagos-Shot Coming-of-Age Short Film

The model's new project was released as a social impact campaign to help COVID-19 relief in Nigeria in collaboration with Melanin Unscripted.

Model and artist Alton Mason shares his new coming-of-age short film "Rise In Light," in collaboration with Melanin Unscripted.

The stunning visuals were shot in Lagos as an introduction to the model's musical debut "Gimmie Gimmie," and has doubled as a social impact campaign in the face of the current pandemic. Mason and Melanin Unscripted founder Amarachi Nwosu set out with a goal of raising $10,000 for the Nigerian-based Khan Foundation to help provide relief packages for families on the ground, and were able to reach their goal in just 24-hours.

"Rise in Light is a movement created by the youth to inspire and ignite the future leaders of our world," says Mason of the campaign. "It's a call for change, evidence of freedom and the expression of love and joy."

The model visited Lagos for the first time last year when filming. "The moment I landed and drove into the city of Lagos, all of those American perceptions, based on fear, were proven false," Mason tells Vogue of his time in Nigeria. I was immediately captivated by nature, the land, the buildings, the water, and the spirit of the country, which made me free to create the song and video in this sacred place. I felt home."

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