Politics

Only 33% of Kenya's Population Voted in the Election Rerun

Just 33 percent of Kenyans voted in the country's rerun election, down from 80 percent in the first election.

Update 10/27: CNN has reported a 33 percent turnout, for the rerun election. This is a major drop from the first round, which had an 80 percent turnout. This might come as a surprise to many, who believed the election would be an easy win for incumbent president Uhuru Kenyatta and the Jubilee Party, though it is being projected that he will still win the overall vote.

Kenya's main opposition party, headed by Raila Odinga is counting the low turnout as a success. As it stands, there is yet to be a clear path out of the current political crisis, as some are already advocating for a third rerun. Clashes between police and demonstrators continued into Friday, with the death toll now at 5, reports the Guardian.

Continue for yesterday's updates:

Kenya's presidential revote is currently underway, and the long-awaited vote could mark the end to a notably tumultuous election season for Kenyans.

While many are heading to the polls, a considerable number of people have chosen to boycott the election in support of opposition leader Raila Odinga, who dropped out of the race earlier this month, citing a corrupt election committee. Ahead of today's election, Odinga urged his followers not to take part in the vote. "Embark on a national campaign of defiance of illegitimate government authority and non-cooperation with all its organs," said Odinga.

Earlier today, he tweeted, asking for a "fresh election" to take place within 90 days.

The candidate also announced a restructuring of the main opposition party, stating that the National Super Alliance (NSA) will transform into the newly found, National Resistance Movement, reports U Report U Report.

Voting Conditions Across the Country:

Though the overall turnout has been much lower than the first time around, voters showed up in large numbers in Kiambu county in Central Kenya in support of Uhuru Kenyatta's Jubilee Party.

Voting in other areas of the country has not gone as smoothly, however. Tear gas was reportedly fired in the city of Kisumu in the Western region of the country—where only three of 399 election commissioners showed up out of fear of intimidation—and shots were later fired, injuring five people and killing one, BBC Africa reports. Opposition supporters also clashed with police in Kibera near the capital, after some decided to build road blocks to prevent peopler from making it to the polls.Tear gas was also used against demonstrators in the area.

Anti-voting demonstrators may have seen some success in Kibera. Nine hours after polls opened in the area, the East Africa Bureau Chief for the New York Times, Jina Moore, posted this picture on Twitter, which appears to show a single vote in a ballot box.

Vote tallying has already begun in some parts of the country. Will this put a final end to Kenya's election crisis? We'll keep you updated on the story.



It's Official: British Vogue Has Made 2022 The Year of the African Model

The major fashion magazine's February 2022 issue features 9 gloriously Black and African models - and we can't get enough.

Sigh... The Black Woman.

Legendary fashion and lifestyle magazine British Vogue has set the tone and welcomed in a new era with their latest cover, celebrating Black women in all of their glory. In what is arguably their most diverse, Afro-centric issue to date, the February 2022 issue of the popular magazine features 9 glorious (and Black) African models. Their latest issue, which celebrates "The Rise of The African Model", features South Sudanese models Adut Akech, Akon Changkou, and Anok Yai, Ethiopian beauty Akway Amar, Senegalese-Italian Dibaa Maty, Nigeria's Jumbo Janet, Nyaguaa from Sierre Leone, Australian Abény Nhial, and American model Majesty Amare.

Photographer Rafael Pavarotti captured the group's beauty, and British Vogue editor-in-chief Edward Enninful's vision beautifully. On the cover, Enninful says, "I saw all these incredible models from across Africa who were just so vivacious and smart. These girls are redefining what it is to be a fashion model. He went on to speak about the soon-to-be-historic cover on his Instagram, writing, "No longer just one or two dark-skinned girls mingled backstage, but a host of top models took a meaningful, substantial and equal place among the most successful women working in fashion today. It means so much to me to see it."

Echoing Edward's words and highlighting the importance of having diverse models on both sides - the model and the viewer - model Adut told the fashion magazine, "When I first started modeling internationally... I would literally be the only Black, dark-skinned girl in the show. There were no Sudanese models, no African models," the 22-year-old model said, "Now, I go to a show and there are girls from my country, girls from Africa who look like me. So yes, there has been a huge change. It has gone from me being the only one at a show, to 15 or 20 of us. I'm just so happy that we are finally at this place. I was tired of always feeling out of place, and feeling like an outcast."



Social media lost it when the cover dropped, many sharing the emotional impact seeing so many Black models on an international cover has over them.



News Brief
Photo by Artur Widak/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Nigeria's Government Has Lifted Its Twitter Ban

We chat to two Nigerians working in media about the restoration of Twitter across the country.

In the late hours of January 12, 2022, the Nigerian government announced the discontinuation of its Twitter ban seven months after it was placed. According to a statement by the National Information Technology Development Agency, signed by President Buhari, the primary cause for lifting the ban was the social media platform’s agreement to open a local office.

Twitter has been a major tool that young Nigerians have used to air their grievances against their government, and foster communities to seek change. The platform served as a strong force during the #EndSARS protests as a virtual protest point, helping circulate important information that peacefully mobilized protesters and secured the release of detained protesters.

"The voices of young Nigerians are often placed in a box by the ruling class, never to be heard," comments journalist Nasir Ahmed Achile. "But the communities formed on Twitter reinforced the idea of strength in numbers and the understanding that we’re all so alike, facing similar struggles, fighting the same oppression."

It came as a big blow on the 8th of June 2021, when the Nigerian government decided to place a ban on Twitter after the platform deleted a tweet by President Muhammadu Buhari, which threatened citizens in the southeast region following destruction of public property.

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Music
(YouTube)

The 5 Songs You Need to Hear This Week

Featuring Burna Boy, Wizkid, Kofie Mole, Joey B, Imarhan, Rema, and more

Every week, we highlight the top releases through our best music of the week column.

Here's our round up of the best tracks and music videos that came across our desks, which you can also check out in our Songs You Need to Hear This Week playlists on Spotify and Apple Music.

Follow our SONGS YOU NEED TO HEAR THIS WEEK playlist on Spotify here and Apple Music here.

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