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Former Kenyan President Daniel Arap Moi Has Passed Away

The Kenyan government has declared national mourning for the country's former president who died at the age of 95.

Kenya's former president Daniel arap Moi has passed away at the age of 95.

Moi was the East African country's second head-of-state following independence from the British and stepped down back in 2002 after mass protests and international pressure following 24 years in office.


President Uhuru Kenyatta has declared the country in mourning following the death of Moi. Speaking about the late politician's contribution to the fight for independence, President Kenyatta said, "The late Mzee Moi's steady hand guided Kenya through the restoration of multi-partyism and many other challenging periods; culminating in the peaceful transfer of power in December 2002."

Vice President William Ruto also expressed his condolences and paid tribute to Moi saying, "It is sad to say goodbye to a man whose legacy we all feel, and we thank Almighty God for the gift of Mzee Moi's leadership. In this sad moment of great loss, therefore, let us still rejoice because of what he did for his countrymen and countrywomen."

Up until 2002, Kenya's political landscape had largely been dominated by the tenures of its first two presidents–Jomo Kenyatta and Moi–who both ran the country as a one-party state before the introduction of multi-party politics. According to the BBC, after winning two controversial elections which were marred by alleged rigging, Moi eventually conceded to handing over power to his successor and the country's third president, Mwai Kibaki.

As is often the case with African leaders who go against the country's constitution by seeking to extend their term in office, Moi had his supporters as well as his equal share of opposition who believed him to be an autocratic leader. Read more about Moi's history here.

Read some of the reactions on social media to Moi's death below:





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7 Gengetone Acts You Need to Check Out

The streets speak gengetone: Kenya's gengetone sound is reverberating across East Africa and the world, get to know its main purveyors.

Sailors' "Wamlambez!"Wamlambez!" which roughly translates to "those who lick," is the cry the reverberated round the world, pushing the gengetone sound to the global stage. The response "wamnyonyez" roughly translates to "those who suck" and that should tell you all you need to know about the genre.

Known for its lewd lyrics and repetitive (often call and response) hooks, gengetone makes no apologies for belonging to the streets. First of all, most artists that create gengetone are grouped into bands with a few outliers like Zzero Sufuri riding solo. The songs themselves often feature a multiplicity of voices with screams and crowds coming through as ad libs, adding to this idea that this is definitely "outside" music.

Listening to Odi wa Muranga play with his vocal on the track "Thao" it's easy to think that this is the first, but gengetone fits snuggly in a history of sheng rap based on the kapuka style beat. Kapuka is onomatopoeically named, the beats have that repetitive drum-hat-drum skip that sounds like pu-ka-pu-ka-pu. Artists like Nonini were asking women to come over using this riff long before Ochungulo family told them to stay home if they aren't willing to give it up.

Here's seven gengetone groups worth listening to.

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