News Brief

This Kenyan Runner Pulled Off a Sick Upset Over the Ethiopian World Record Holder in the 1500 M To Win Gold

Faith Chepng'etich Kipyegon outran Ethiopia’s Genzebe Dibaba in the final lap.

Faith Chepng'etich Kipyegon pulled off quite possibly the sickest upset of the Rio games against Ethiopian world record holder in the final lap of the 1500 meter race to win gold.


Genzebe Dibaba of Ethiopia looked poised to hold off the competition at the Joao Havelange Stadium Wednesday until the Kenyan middle distance runner overtook her, surging across the finish line at 4:08:93—a mere two seconds ahead of Dibaba’s time of 4:10:27. It was a taste of revenge for the two-time world junior champion after she had finished second behind Dibaba at the 2015 Worlds in Beijing.

Kenyan gold medalist in the 1500 meter Faith Chepng'etich Kipyegon, Photo credit: screenshot from NBC

Dibaba, who picked up a silver medal, was favored to win after her insane time of 3:50:07 in set a world record in the the 1500 meter in 2015. She was without her coach James Aden after he was allegedly found with performance enhancing drugs in Spain earlier this summer.

"I didn't believe I could win but I thank God for helping me to win here in Rio. It's my first Olympics and I'm so excited," Kipyegon says, basking in her Olympic triumph.

Kipyegon has captured the third gold medal for Kenya, which she dedicated to her boyfriend, following track and field compatriots David Rudisha and Jemima Sumgong who are also taking home gold. The East African country’s medal count could have been higher if other countries like Bahrain hadn’t poached its athletes.

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Photo by Don Paulsen/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Hugh Masekela's New York City Legacy

A look back at the South African legend's time in New York City and his enduring presence in the Big Apple.

In Questlove's magnificent documentary, Summer of Soul, he captures a forgotten part of Black American music history. But in telling the tale of the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival, the longtime musician and first-time filmmaker also captures a part of lost South African music history too.

Among the line-up of blossoming all-stars who played the Harlem festival, from a 19-year-old Stevie Wonder to a transcendent Mavis Staples, was a young Hugh Masekela. 30 years old at the time, he was riding the wave of success that came from releasing Grazing in the Grass the year before. To watch Masekela in that moment on that stage is to see him at the height of his time in New York City — a firecracker musician who entertained his audiences as much as he educated them about the political situation in his home country of South Africa.

The legacy Masekela sowed in New York City during the 1960s remains in the walls of the venues where he played, and in the dust of those that are no longer standing. It's in the records he made in studios and jazz clubs, and on the Manhattan streets where he once posed with a giant stuffed zebra for an album cover. It's a legacy that still lives on in tangible form, too, in the Hugh Masekela Heritage Scholarship at the Manhattan School of Music.

The school is the place where Masekela received his education and met some of the people that would go on to be life-long bandmates and friends, from Larry Willis (who, as the story goes, Masekela convinced to give up opera for piano) to Morris Goldberg, Herbie Hancock and Stewart Levine, "his brother and musical compadre," as Mabusha Masekela, Bra Hugh's nephew says.

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