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Uganda Plans to Re-introduce its Inhuman 'Kill the Gays' Bill

Should the bill be passed in parliament, homosexuality will be punished by death.

Uganda is yet another African country with some of the most discriminatory laws as it pertains to members of the LGBTQ community. According to the Daily Mail, the government plans to bring back to parliament a bill called "Kill the Gays" which was rejected five years ago based on a technicality. With Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni's support, the government intends to not only punish homosexuality with the death penalty but also criminalize those who are involved in its "promotion and recruitment". There has been tremendous backlash and condemnation of the news on social media.


Many activists and members of the LGBTQ community have expressed concerns that the bill will result in increased targeted violence and hate crimes. Pepe Julian Onziema, from Sexual Minorities Uganda, said that already three gay men and one transgender woman had been murdered in homophobic attacks this year alone.

Back in 2014, Uganda's constitutional court rejected the controversial bill on a technicality because it reportedly included the death penalty. However, the Minister of Ethics and Integrity, Simon Lokodo, is certain that it will be passed successfully this time. In a statement, Lokodo said that, "Homosexuality is not natural to the Ugandans, but there has been a massive recruitment by gay people in schools, and especially among the youth, where they are promoting the falsehood that people are born like that." Lokodo went on to add that, "Our current penal law is limited. It only criminalizes the act. We want it made clear that anyone who is even involved in promotion and recruitment has to be criminalized. Those that do grave acts will be given the death sentence."

Although in the past, international outrage over anti-gay laws has led to countries including the United States of America, Netherlands, Norway and Denmark as well as entities such as the World Bank, reducing their financial aid to the East African country, the Ugandan government says that is prepared for the backlash and will not "bow to a people who want to impose a culture which is foreign to us."

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South Africa Makes History with its First Ever Healthcare Facility for Transgender People

The University of the Witwatersrand's Reproductive Health Institute is creating a safe space for transgender people seeking healthcare.

South Africa has made history after it opened the doors to its first dedicated healthcare facility for transgender people. According to eNCA, the Reproductive Health Institute, which has been set up by the prestigious University of the Witwatersrand, wants to create a safe space for transgender South Africans by removing the stigma and prejudice they often face while trying to access healthcare in the country. It is a major stride against the backdrop of a continent that generally still treats members of the LGBT community as second-class citizens.

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The World Congress of Families is Expanding its Homophobic Agenda into West Africa

The far-right organization recently held a regional conference in Accra.

Last year, Ghanaians took to the streets to protest against laws criminalizing homosexuality. The protests were primarily in response to a 72-page report published by the Human Rights Watch which detailed how violence towards members of the LGBT community by mobs or their own family members was on the rise. Scores of protesters insisted that the country's Penal Code was not only a dated colonial-era relic but that it led to LGBT Ghanaians being treated as second-class citizens without basic human rights. While countries such as Botswana and Angola made huge strides this year and decriminalized homosexuality, Ghana's discriminatory laws have remained and lives continue to be affected because of it.

On November 1st, the World Congress of Families (WCF), a far-right organization that has been pegged a hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center, hosted a regional conference in Accra, Ghana. The two-day gathering included Ghana's political and religious leaders who subscribe to the conservative "pro-family" and "natural law" ideologies which condemn homosexuality, Islam, abortion and other reproductive health rights. There is increasing concern among members of the LGBT community, activists and allies, that LGBT people will experience even more targeted violence not only in Ghana but other African countries where homosexuality has still not been decriminalized.

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Miss South Africa Wants Men to Write Love Letters to Women to Fight Against Gender-Based Violence

Unfortunately, there's nothing stopping abusive men from writing these love letters too.

South Africa's newly crowned Miss SA Zozibini "Zozi" Tunzi has launched a "HeForShe" campaign which aims to tackle the alarming rates of femicide and gender-based violence in the country. The campaign, which is in partnership with the South African arm of the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women), wants South African men to step up and join the collective fight against abuse. However, the campaign has been criticized by many because of the way in which it wants men to step—by writing love letters to women. The campaign has divided South Africans, particularly those on social media.

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Former Gambian Beauty Queen Fatou Jallow's Movement Against Sexual Assault Gains Traction

After publicly accusing former President Yahya Jammeh of rape, young women under the #IamToufah banner are standing against sexual assault in the country.

A few months ago, former Gambian beauty queen Fatou 'Toufah' Jallow publicly accused former President Yahya Jammeh of rape. The 23-year-old alleged that Jammeh had raped her following her refusal of his marriage proposal during his time in office back in 2015. Under the leadership of current President Adama Barrow, The Gambian government established the Truth, Reconciliation and Reparations Commission (TRRC) which is now investigating human rights violations during Jammeh's tenure. Jallow, who is testifying at the commission, has spurred a movement where young women are taking a stand against sexual assault in the country under the #IamToufah banner.

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