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Nigerian Experimental Soul Artist Kingsley Ibeneche Expands On 'Realms'

The vocalist and dance performer explores the power of his Nigerian roots on this second release.

Kingsley Ibeneche makes deep, expansive tunes through the vehicle of soul music—bridging the gap between R&B and Afropop. Born Kingsley Ugumba Ibeneche to Igbo parents from the Udo and Obizi villages, the first-generation New Jersey native spent most summers as child shuttling between the east coast and Nigeria. It's during these trips when this rising artist first made lasting connections with this heritage.

"We come from a heavy line of artists, philosophers, and all around rebels," Kingsley reflected in an interview with OkayAfrica, "I have fond memories of going to Nigerian gatherings and seeing all the colorful garbs, hearing the traditional Nigerian highlife and African music play, and seeing all of our parents dance until the sun came out." The magic of these experiences was echoed through the rituals of his community's Nigerian-American church, where gospel music knows few limits. Kingsley's 2017 debut release CHi is a clear product of this spiritually grounded upbringing, championing the sacred-secular origins of R&B.


Kingsley Ibeneche - Sanctuary (Official Music Video) youtu.be

On the singer-songwriter's second effort, Realms, the Philadelphia-based musician delves into experimental soul with a sound that summons his African roots. Realms boasts a level of sophistication and technical prowess that's presented with ease and grace, speaking to the artist's personal and professional modesty. Paying homage to the buttery grooves of D'Angelo's Voodoo and the Terrace Martin-assisted progressive jazz productions of Kendrick Lamar, Kingsley's style is at once challenging and provocative.

Kingsley also took inspiration from the Nigerian pop music his family played at home to craft the Afrofusion workouts of Realms. "You could always hear chants of Chief Stephen Osita Osadebe, Oliver de Coque, P-Square," said Kingsley, explaining how the sounds of his childhood spill into the new music. "Those same chants I used as inspiration for this project."

Photo: Marcus Branch. Courtesy of Kingsley Ibeneche.

The ethereal, ever-changing soundscape of Realms was expertly crafted by executive producer Lee Clarke, who composes surreal and futuristic worlds on these six songs. With Kinglsey's mesmeric voice leading the way, it's easy enough to gleam over these sophisticated productions, but Clarke's subtleties make themselves known upon multiple listens. Boom bap ("Sanctuary"), free jazz ("Loud"), Nigerian highlife ("To The Citadel"), post-dubstep and rap ("The Sound") collide with spectacular results on the new Astro Nautico EP.

Along with Clarke, Kingsley enlists a host of underground Philly talents to lend vocals and additional instrumentation to Realms. Devin Farrell and Pontiac laid down vocal melodies, while Kevin Ripley performed drums and Jarrett Gilgore contributed a pair of fiery saxophone solos. The five featured musicians comprise Kingsley Ibeneche's live band, The Dirty Dieties, who help bring the music of Realms to life.

Performed live, the music of Kingsley Ibeneche takes shape as a soul opera, where theatre and musical performance meet to form an ambitious new medium. Aside from songwriting, Kingsley is also an accomplished dance performer, having graced the MTV VMAs and Saturday Night Live stages with the likes of Travis Scott and James Blake. Debuting in Philadelphia this spring, the live show promises to include movement, monologue, constructed sets, lighting design and projection. "My live show isn't far from a movie," described Kingsley. "I make sure to always have dancers to move with me in free expression. I sometimes call upon the audience to participate in movement. I love to have the communal feel of the village."

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Illustration by Simone Martin-Newberry

A 15-Year-Old Nigerian Student Lends Her Voice to the Fight Against Boko Haram With Graphic Novel

Aisha Mustapha's graphic novel about her experiences under Boko Haram was published today for International Day of the Girl.

Aisha Mustapha, is a 15-year-old student from Nigeria, using her voice to tell her own story. The young writer recently penned a graphic novel about her experience fleeing Boko Haram, locating her family and trying to further her education. It's a heavy subject, obviously, but with her graphic novel, she offers a voice for young people directly affected by the crisis in Northern Nigeria.

The book was published today to mark the International Day of the Girl, a day established by the United Nations in 2011 to "highlight and address the needs and challenges girls face, while promoting girls' empowerment and the fulfillment of their human rights."

Aisha's talent for storytelling has previously been highlighted in Assembly, a by-girls-for-girls publication by the Malala Fund that brought Aisha's graphic novel to life, premiering it today in conjunction with International Day of the GIrl. Tess Thomas, Assembly's editor, elaborated on the purpose of the publication saying, "We believe in the power of girls' voices to generate change. Our publication provides girls with a platform so their opinions and experiences can inform decisions about their futures."

Aisha's words were illustrated by artist Simone Martin-Newberry, who had this to say about the process of creating the visuals for the graphic novel: "I was very moved by Aisha's story, and really wanted to treat it sensitively and do it justice with my illustrations. My aim was to capture the real emotions and actions of the story, but also keep my artwork bright and colorful and full of pattern, to help reflect Aisha's amazing youthful spirit."

Check out some excerpts from the piece below and head here to read it in full.
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(Photo Courtesy of BBC Africa Eye)

An Interview With Kiki Mordi, the Nigerian Journalist Behind the BBC’s #SexForGrades Documentary

Meet the reporter whose undercover reporting exposed rampant sexual harassment in West African universities.

Nigeria and Ghana have been reeling ever since the release of the Sex for Grades film from BBC Africa Eye earlier this week. It was an undercover expose of the sexual harassment and extortion female students face in two of prestigious universities. Since the release of the year-long investigation, #SexForGrades has been trending, and many more women have come forward with their own experiences. Four of the professors implicated in the footage have been suspended from their positions and the Nigerian Senate has decided to reintroduce a sexual harassment bill. Suffice it to say, the film has caused a stir.

The woman behind the film is Kiki Mordi, a 28-year-old Nigerian journalist who had experienced sexual harassment herself in her university years. We spoke with her in an exclusive and enlightening interview about her reaction to the waves she's causing, what it is like to relive and report on traumatic situations and the depth of harassment culture. She also gives a direct answer to one of the implicated professor's statements that she was enacting a form of neocolonialism.

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Keith Roper/Flickr Creative Commons

Kais Saied is Set to Become Tunisia's Next President

While official results have not been published, the retired academic reportedly secured 76 percent of the votes according to the exit polls.

Last week, Tunisia held its legislative elections, according to reports by Aljazeera. The Ennahda Movement obtained 52 seats in the 217-member parliament while the Karoui's Heart of Tunisia party came second, with 38 seats. While the presidential elections were only scheduled to take place in November, they were pushed forward after the country's first democratically-elected president, Beji Caid Essebsi, passed away in July. Two independent candidates, media mogul Nabil Karoui and retired law professor Kais Saied, have been facing off in the presidential runoff. However, recent exit polls suggest that Saied secured between 72 and 77 percent of the vote.

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MINNEAPOLIS, MN - OCTOBER 10: U.S. President Donald Trump speaks on stage during a campaign rally at the Target Center on October 10, 2019 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. (Photo by Stephen Maturen/Getty Images).

Trump Attacks Ilhan Omar & Minnesota's Somali Community In Disparaging Anti-Immigrant Campaign Speech

Trump stepped up his demonization of Minnesota's Somali community in front of a braying crowd of MAGA-hat wearing supporters.

On Thursday, US President Donald Trump held a campaign rally in Minneapolis, Minnesota and—in typical white-nationalist fashion—used a significant portion of his speech to disparage the local Somali community, and once again take shots at the state's Somali-born Representative Ilhan Omar.

"As you know for many years leaders in Washington brought large numbers of refugees to your state from Somalia without considering the impact on schools and communities and taxpayers," said Trump, echoing the countless anti-immigrant statements he's made in the past. "You should be able to decide what is best for your own cities and for your own neighborhoods and that's what you have the right to do right now, and believe me, no other president would be doing that," he added as his supporters cheered him on.

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