Poetry

Koleka Putuma Is the Groundbreaking New Voice of South African Poetry

Koleka Putuma doesn't play by the rules in her debut anthology.

South African poet Koleka Putuma is a rockstar. She's not playing by the rules and her poetry is direct without being cliché. The Cape Town-based poet's debut anthology, Collective Amnesia, which was released in April this year, was accompanied by visuals—both photography and videos, something you don't see in South Africa.


She went against the odds when she released the book. “I remember a veteran writer that I had great respect for telling me: 'Publishing a book of poems in South Africa? You will be lucky if you sell 200 copies in your book's lifetime, and be grateful if 20 people show up to your book launch. Just know you are doing it for you,'" she once mused on a Facebook post just after her successful nationwide book tour in June. “So here we are, in less than three months since its release: a national tour, 13 cities, 17 launches, a prescribed text for second-year university students, four print runs, 2,000 copies later."

“She's born in 1993, and [her book] is already being read in Stellenbosch (University) and UCT (University of Cape Town)," says Milisuthando Bongela, editor of Friday, the arts and culture section of the newspaper Mail & Guardian. This is during one of the three Johannesburg stops of Putuma's book tour, which had other stops in places such as Durban and Eastern Cape. “I've never seen anyone do that," Bongela continues. “And when you get inside the book, you see yourself for once. The most powerful thing for me about this book, is that this person who was born in 1993 was never meant to experience apartheid or any sort of discrimination, has now written a book that archives her experiences in this so-called free country that we live in."

The cover of Collective Amnesia. Photography by Andiswa Mkosi.

Bongela is flanking Putuma at the Market Theatre alongside revered South African poet Lebo Mashile. Both of them can't stop singing praises to the ground-breaking poet.

Before Putuma opens the event with a reading from the book, Afurakan, another revered poet and co-founder of the poetry movement Word N Sound, has a few words of introduction. “At this stage," says Afurakan, “I would say she's the dream of the work that we do as a company—to be able to give young poets space for them to perform, to express themselves and watch them run with that opportunity and turn it into something magnificent."

Afurakan goes on to recount the first time he encountered Putuma. It was during the first South African National Poetry Slam, organized by Word N Sound in 2014. “Everyone had props," Afurakan describes the competition. “It was dramatic, but Koleka, with just three simple poems, won the slam. And she took that little credibility that came with that and ran with it. And three years later, look where she is now, with an award for directing, a 2016 PEN SA Student Writing Prize (for her poem Water), and she just launched a book."

Putuma's sharp eyes scan the room, as she stands up with a wry smirk to read her first piece for the night. It's a poem called 1994: A Love Poem, a tongue-in-cheek take on white South Africans' juvenile obsession with late apartheid struggle hero and former South African president, Nelson Mandela. It's a poem that stylistically references meme culture. “I want someone who's going to look at me and love me the way white people look at and love Mandela," she pauses briefly for the audience to finish laughing. “You don't know love until you've been loved like Mandela/ You don't know betrayal until you've been loved like Mandela/ You don't know fuckery until you've been loved like Mandela…"

Her readings take me back to the few events I've seen her perform at in Cape Town. Her book Collective Amnesia includes some poems she has read before. One of the most prominent being Water, one of her most popular pieces to date. It's surreal to hold an anthology of someone who speaks the way I do—with slang, making reference to the internet, hip-hop, Oppikoppi, Nike, God's medical bill, and has no economy for expletives. The South African publishing industry has its own types of books that it favors, and Collective Amnesia just wouldn't normally make the cut.

Which is why Putuma's book is a special moment. She was born only one year before South Africa had its first democratically elected president. She is one of the many voices of our generation that doesn't have any memories of apartheid, but is feeling its repercussions and fighting its own social ills such as gender-based violence, patriarchy, homophobia, and the like.

Collective Amnesia is written in a quirky and unconventional way. For instance, the poem Apartheid, which consists of just a title and a footnote, is an intense one-liner that will first make you chuckle, then ponder, and then realize how little has changed in post-apartheid South Africa for black people.

The poet celebrates and mourns her blackness, womxn-ness and queerness through the book's three sections—Inherited Memory, Buried Memory and Postmemory.

Writer Maneo Mohale described Collective Amnesia best in her review of the anthology on the Mail & Guardian: “The book reads as a deeply personal diary and as a public reflection on the ever-shifting politics of identity, in a country that is still deeply troubled by the past's complicated legacies."

And indeed, Collective Amnesia does come from a lot of personal experiences. “Before this book, about two years ago," Putuma explains during the discussion she's having with Bongela and Mashile. “I used to look at my mother and my auntie's choices and think, 'Why would you stay? Why would you choose that in that particular situation?' But after writing this book and having experienced things as a black womxn, I learned that, in that particular situation, your mother and aunt chose silence so that they could live, or so that there could be peace in the house, so that they could eat."

“What I like about this book, beyond talking about whiteness, white people, and white supremacy," says Bongela, “[is that it touches on] this very difficult subject of our uncles, family members, and [rape] apologists – that's very difficult to talk about. We haven't figured out a lexicon of how to deal with the bullshit that's happening in our families. It's easier to fight the public in the public sphere, which is necessary, but then when it's just us, ah, kunzima (it's difficult). And this book laid it all out. We as black people know what's going on in this book."

On the poem Memoirs Of A Queer Slave & Queer Person, which is just four lines long, Putuma writes poignantly about the dangers of being queer in South Africa: “I don't want to die with my hands up or legs open." On Xmas Dinner With Skeletons, she writes about domestic sexual violence: “Your perpetuator has your uncle's eyes and his cheap brandy breath/ How many abortions have fallen out of your mouth while counting the men in your life."

On Black Solidarity, she talks about the hypocrisy of black male activists, and the sexism and patriarchy of such men: “How come your revolution always wants to go rummaging through my underwear?... How come references to your revolution are limited to Biko and Fanon and Malcolm?/ Do you read?/ Your solidarity, it seems, is anchored by undermining black womxn's struggle."

“If you are a black womxn in this country, you either get a bullet in your head, and they kill you fast, or they kill you slow over the course of a lifetime," says Mashile when her turn to speak comes. She starts by referencing her experience as a black womxn poet in South Africa; how the media never focused on her work, but her celebrity and fame. “None of us are spared," she continues. “It's important to have tools that are going to be a lifeline for you, and I think this book is a lifeline for the second-year students who are studying in the most racist institutions in this country. It's a lifeline for all the young womxn who are working in corporate South Africa, who follow Koleka's work online. It's going to be a lifeline for anyone who feels invisible and unheard, and who needs the reality to be validated."

Mashile's face beams as she admits to being an avid follower of the young poet's work, and how she admires her methods of getting her work out. “She's exploding the model of South African literature, which is a wonderful thing," Mashile says. “She is emerging, and with authority, to claim her space and audience. The fact that she is now on her third print, and the book has just come out is extraordinary. I'm watching with hawk eyes, dedication and admiration, because you are inventing a new model for us in South Africa. And it's important. The work that you are doing is very necessary. The people who you are opening the way for… there are young girls who will be reading this work to survive, and not drink pills and take their lives. Ten to 15 years from now, they will reference and thank you."

Photography by Andiswa Mkosi.

As she sits now, there is a slide show of recurring portraits of the poet on a screen behind Putuma. The images were shot by photographer Andiswa Mkosi. One audience member asks her about the collaboration with Mkosi, to which Putuma responds, “This was not going to be the cover of the book. There was another cover that I wasn't excited about. Then Andy and I got together, and the first thing she asked me was, 'what are you trying to say in this book?'"

Mkosi asked Putuma about the themes in the book and read some parts of the anthology. “Then she said," continues the poet. “'What I'm getting from it is things or faces and names that have been hidden, now being unveiled.'

So the theme for the photography was about hiding and an unveiling. “Unveiling memory, amnesia, stories of black mothers and white babies and us playing with our dolls, and black womxn," she says. “Initially not all of them were supposed to be in public like this," she says pointing at the screen. “We were supposed to choose one for the cover. But they were so beautiful and said so many things about the work that I was like, 'I will take them wherever I go.'"

The images are currently on sale as prints, independent of the book, because Putuma's imagination just goes beyond the box that has been placed around artists. What her next move is, one may never know, and that's the beauty of being her fan.

All videos by Jarryd Kleinhans

Collective Amnesia is available in bookshops around South Africa, and on Amazon.

Revisit our 2015 interview with Koleka Putuma here, and our interview with Andiswa Mkosi from earlier this year here.

Literature
Photo by Daniel Gilbert Bwette

On Reinventing African Lit: All the Buzz From East Africa’s Biggest Literary Festival

We talked to attendees at the Writivism Festival in Kampala about what makes a memorable legacy in African literature.

The acclaimed writer Taban Lo liyong has an easy strategy to make people speak more honestly about literature—drink red wine, say something controversial, and apologize later.

Liyong was scheduled to be the opening keynote speaker for the 2018 Writivism festival in Uganda that took place over the weekend in Kampala. Ugandan writers might not dominate discussions about African literature, but Kampala is a city that has hosted the most notorious debates about the genre from the Makerere conference to Transition magazine where writers like Ezekiel Mphalele, Chinua Achebe and Ngugi wa Thiong'o argued with each other about what made writing "African" or "good." Writivism follows that tradition of gathering people from all over the continent in Kampala to discuss what African literature is.

The theme for the festival this year was "Legacy." Since Liyong had said in 1965 that East Africa was a literary desert, there was no one better to reflect on how far East African literature had come. In his keynote, he proclaimed that the novel Kintu (2014) by Jennifer Makumbi had finally broken Uganda's dry spell. Makumbi was great because she had mastered the art of long form narrative, critiqued Ugandan royalty, and managed to "graduate from a muslim college in the East and still remain interesting." She was the writer Liyong had been waiting to read for forty years.

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Poetry
Image via Flickr CC

5 Afro-Latinx Poets You Should Know

Get familiar with the work of this talented group of poets.

This August, OkayAfrica shines a light on the connections between Africa and the Latin-American world. Whether it's the music, politics or intellectual traditions, Africans have long been at the forefront of Latino culture, but they haven't always gotten the recognition. We explore the history of Afro-Latino identity and its connection to the motherland.

I have a strategy for finding new poetry to read: I take my friends to a bookstore and they can't help but comment on the latest works and suggest writers that would resonate with me.

Many of the poets on the following list came from that process. After exploring their work, I ended up enjoying the poems so much I wondered why I hadn't found them myself in the first place.

These five Afro-Latinx poets engage various topics from migrants crossing to Europe to the politics of loneliness in the 70's. Below are five Afro-Latinx poets you should check out.

Aracelis Girmay

One of the most memorable names for a poem is "Elelegy" which is what Aracelis Girmay creates by combining the word "elegy" with the sound of ululation made in many parts of East Africa. She begins her most recent book Black Maria (2016) with "Elelegy" where she introduces herself—"I, Aracelis Kay Weyni Girmay, the narrator-author, born in the/United States. My routes: Eritrea, Puerto Rico, African American."

Girmay uses her family background to think about various sea crossings in Black diasporic histories from Eritrean migrants crossing to Europe to enslaved Africans crossing to the Americas. Her poetry not only tackles politics through family history, but also friendship as a way of creating new family. "I am only 10 & riding/ all of my horses home/ still sisterless, wanting sisters" she writes in one of the best poems "Moon for Aisha" that celebrates the poet Kamilah Aisha Moon who makes her realize that new relationships can change how you remember your history.

Vincent Toro

Vincent Toro's book Stereo.Island.Mosaic does not shy away from the brutal histories of empire as Toro explores and celebrates Puerto Rico. "This island is a bridge

between the Orishas/and the astronauts./This island is a blender,/polychrome vortex stirring/the soot of the empire/with abrazos and batas," he writes in his poem "GUANÍN."

Toro is not only a poet, but a playwright, director and educator. His book explores identity in the collective, ambitiously engaging themes like colonization, race, and Caribbean identity. If you're interested in poetry that wrestles with global concepts without ignoring small details, check out Toro's work.

Nicole Sealey

Nicole Sealey introduces herself in her debut collection Ordinary Beast (2017) through the first poem "Medical history" that is less clinical than it's title implies. "I've been pregnant. I've had sex with a man/who's had sex with men. I can't sleep.../I'm spooked by wind. Cousin Lilly died/from an aneurysm. Aunt Hilda, a heart attack" She says in lines more tender than most confessions made to a doctor but still as uncomfortable.

Sealey knows how to think through rituals, whether it is the histories told to doctors or the houses created to appease gods. In her poem "Igboland," she writes about the creation of a mbari, a process where a community builds a house for the Nigerian goddess Ala, before the workers discard and burn the clothes they used for their labor. "The West in me wants the mansion/to last. The African knows it cannot./Every thing aspires to one/degradation or another. I want/to learn how to make something/ holy, then walk away," Sealey writes. She explores what a medical history also reveals, that what is meaningful does not have to be permanent.

Lorenzo Thomas

Lorenzo Thomas is a poet who was a vibrant member of the Black Arts Movement in New York City. He was born in Panama in 1944 and spend most of his life in New York. His style and politics were greatly influenced by African poets writing in Portuguese like Francisco-Jose Tenreiro and Marcelino dos Santos and also poets like Léopold Senghor.

Thomas is a poet to return to because his lines always feel timeless, capturing a perfect balance between ordinary and political pain—"All Americans are losing/Their minds are going crazy/With the fear of being/Alone/In the world/Going nowhere." His poetry addresses various issues like the Vietnam war, civil rights, or American media culture but you can read poems he wrote in the 70's and still feel like they are just as relevant today.

María Fernanda (Chamorro)

Poets often write like translators who show their work by dissecting and considering how every word could expose memories or find new meanings. María Fernanda is a translator and her poems reflect that craft in the ways that simple words take you into multiple worlds.

María Fernanda thinks about family in ways that remind me of Girmay. In one of her earlier poem "GUAYAQUIL, 1996," she invokes sea crossings with it's connotations of the breaking and making of family in a poem that explores the process of adoption. "The nurses, calling me by my middle name/Because every orphan girl was named María, pulled the Dress/Over my head and I watched the bow disappear from my hair/Like a boat leaving one for the next," she writes, exposing through an unravelling bow how girlhood can be interrupted and created.

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Davido's Fiancé, Chioma Rowland, Tests Positive For Coronavirus

The Nigerian musician made the announcement via a heartfelt Instagram post on Friday.

Chioma Rowland, the fiancé of star Nigerian musician Davido, has tested positive for the coronavirus.

The artist shared the news via Instagram on Friday, writing that he and 31 people on his team decided to get tested after returning back to Lagos from abroad. While he and the rest of his team received negative results, Rowland's test came back positive.

"Unfortunately, my fiancé's results came back positive while all 31 others tested have come back negative including our baby," wrote Davido. He added that they both showed no systems, but would be self-isolating as a safety measure.

"We are however doing perfectly fine and she is even still yet to show any symptoms whatsoever. She is now being quarantined and I have also gone into full self isolation for the minimum 14 days," he added. "I want to use this opportunity to thank you all for your endless love and prayers in advance and to urge everyone to please stay at home as we control the spread of this virus! Together we can beat this!"

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Juls Drops New Music Video for 'Soweto Blues' Featuring Busiswa and Jaz Karis

The Ghanaian-British producer heads to South Africa for the music video for the amapiano-inspired track.

Heavyweight Ghanaian-British producer Juls shares his first offering of 2020, and it does not disappoint.

The producer enlists South African music star Busiswa and London's Jaz Karis for the jazz-inflected "Soweto Blues," which also boasts elements of South Africa's dominant electronic sound, Amapiano. The slow-burner features airy vocals from Karis who features prominently on the 3-minute track, while Busiswa delivers a standout bridge in her signature high-energy tone.

"The song dubbed "Soweto Blues" is a song depicting the love, sadness and fun times that Soweto tends to offer its people," read the song's YouTube description. The video premiered earlier today on The Fader. "The energy is amazing, the people are lovely and I've found a second home — especially the vibrancy of Soweto," the producer told The Fader about his trip to Soweto for the making of the video "Jaz Karis is singing a love song, which is symbolic of my new love of Soweto and I'm honoured to have worked with Busiswa whom I have been a fan of for a long time."

Fittingly, the music video sees Juls traveling through the township, taking in its sights and energy. The video, directed by Nigel Stöckl, features striking shots of the popular area and its skilled pantsula dancers.

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