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Lady Moon & The Eclipse Share Their Futuristic Afro-R&B Sound In ‘Rollercoaster’

Watch the visuals for "Rollercoaster," the latest single from Brooklyn-based band Lady Moon & The Eclipse.

In their debut EP Believe, Brooklyn-based musical group Lady Moon & The Eclipse hope to create a piece that examines their multiculturality, spirituality and melody.


Named after lead vocalist, Ngonda Badila, whose name means “moon” in Congolese, the six-person band fuzes R&B influences with afrobeat rhythms to tell stories on “inclusivity and spiritual unity” notes the band’s website.

The band—the ‘Eclipse’ to Ngonda’s ‘Lady Moon’— includes Nkoula Badila and Ntangou Badila as backup vocalists, Arlen Hart on the keys, Jonathan Camuzeaux on bass, and Ken Reichl on drums.

Their lead single “Rollercoaster,” which the group released a video for earlier this year highlights Ngonda in a white scarf and ethereal lighting singing directly to the camera.

An afrofuturistic sound and visual, “Rollercoaster” resonates with Lady Moon & The Eclipse’s overall appeal—funk meets afrobeats, old R&B meets new wave.

If you’re intrigued or hooked, catch Lady Moon & The Eclipse at their next performance at the Brooklyn Bowl on June 27. In the meantime, take a listen to Believe below.

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Still from YouTube.

'Entertainment Has Saved Nigeria'—Here's What Happened When Davido Spoke at Columbia University

The artist discussed his new album 'A Good Time' and changing perceptions of Africa through music with Melanin Unscripted founder Amarachi Nwosu.

A week ago, media platform and digital agency Melanin Unscripted along with Columbia University's African Students Association hosted none other than Nigerian megastar Davido for a talk entitled "Shaping the Image of Africa Through Music," which focused on the themes in his newly released sophomore album A Good Time as well as "the next frontier of afrobeats."

There was a feeling of pride and excitement as attendees—mostly African students from Columbia, gathered at university's campus in NYC. The night's two hosts quizzed the audience on Davido trivia, and ran through other Afrobeats-related questions to keep the audience entertained as we awaited the artist's arrival.

Once Davido finally came through—about an hour and a half later—the excitement still hadn't waned. Moderator, Amarachi Nwosu, the founder of Melanin Unscripted, asked the artist a range of questions that touched on the role of social media in helping spread African pop music, using his platform and influence to address social issues in his country—"entertainment has saved Nigeria," the artist remarked—as well as the making of A Good Time. "I just got tired of Americans singing 'If' and 'Fall," the artist joked.

In line with the night's theme, the event was an overall "good time," complete with a fun conversation between Davido and Nwosu that highlighted the artist's humorous side and energetic personality. You can check out the 45-minute conversation in full below courtesy of Melanin Unscripted.

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Darkovibes in "Mike Tyson" (Youtube)

Watch Darkovibes & Runtown's New Video For 'Mike Tyson'

"Mike Tyson is a song for champions, pathfinders and trail blazers," Darkovibes' team says of the single and Accra-shot video.

A few months ago, Ghanaian artist and La Meme Gang member Darkovibes connected with Nigeria's Runtown for "Mike Tyson."

That addictive single now gets a new music video, directed by Zed, which follows both artists across Accra's High street and other city locations.

"Mike Tyson is a song for champions, pathfinders and trail blazers," a statement from Darkovibes' team reads. "It is for those who stand against popular opinions and make it. Runtown... touches on developmental issues in Nigeria. He also speaks on being bold in the face of institutional oppositions and signs out with a badman proclamation."

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Burna Boy. Photo by Joseph Okpako/WireImage (via Getty Images).

The 20 Best Nigerian Songs of 2019

Featuring Burna Boy, Rema, Tiwa Savage, Zlatan, Mr Eazi, Wizkid, Teni, Davido, Lady Donli and many more.

2019 was another huge year for Nigerian music.

Zlatan's presence was ubiquitous and powered by the zeal for zanku, a dance which is now de rigueur. Rema led the charge for a group of young breakthrough artists that include Fireboy DML and Joeboy. They all represent an exciting crop of talents that point the way forward for Nigerian pop.

Burna Boy's new dominance, built around his excellent African Giant album, delivered on his rare talents, while the long wait for Davido's sophomore album, A Good Time, paid off in satisfying fashion. Simi's Omo Charlie Champagne Vol. 1 announced her departure from her longterm label. Tiwa Savage also made a highly-discussed move from Mavin Records to Universal Music Group. Meanwhile, Yemi Alade exuded female strength with her latest record, Woman of Steel.

Not to be left out, Wizkid sated demands for his fourth album with a new collaborative EP following a year of stellar features that included his presence on Beyoncé's Lion King: The Gift, an album which also boasts Tekno, Mr Eazi and Tiwa Savage. Mr Eazi also notably launched his emPawa initiative to help fund Africa's promising up-and-coming artists.

Asa returned in a formidable form with Lucid, while buzzing artists like Tay Iwar, Santi, and Lady Donli all shared notable releases. Lastly, the beef between Vector and M.I climaxed and sparked a resurgence of Nigerian rap releases from Phyno to Ycee, PsychoYP and more.

Read on for the best Nigerian songs of 2019. Listed in no particular order. —Sabo Kpade

Follow our NAIJA HITS playlist on Spotify here and Apple Music here.

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OkayAfrica Presents: 'The Adinkra Oracle' December Reading with Simone Bresi-Ando

We're back with another Adinkra reading from Simone Bresi-Ando to help guide you through the end of the year—and the end of the decade.

It's the a new month and that means we're ready for a new Adinkra reading from Simone Bresi-Ando to help you navigate your December.

After cleansing the space, Simone will pull five Adinkra Ancestral Guidance Cards from a deck of 44 Adinkra symbols—these cards help to channel information, messages and direction from your ancestors using Adinkra symbols when read correctly. Remember, as Simone says, "these readings tell you what you need to know and not necessarily what you want to know—our ancestors are emotionally pure."

Simone gives a general reading of what December has in store to help you know what actions and thoughts are necessary to get the best out of the month. This is a special installment as it also guides you through the end of the year—and the end of the decade.

Watch below.

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