Events

Ready Or Not, Lagos? Lauryn Hill Is Finally Coming To Nigeria

Lauryn Hill will be performing for the first time in Lagos, Nigeria on August 30 at Eko Hotel and Suites alongside a 20-man band.


Photo: Vickey Ford for Okayplayer/Sneakshot

Earlier this year, Ms. Lauryn Hill apologized to her fans in Nigeria with a memorable acoustic performance of her classic "Doo Wop (That Thing)" after having to postpone what would have been her first show ever in the country. In the video, she assured fans that she'd make it to Nigeria at a later date, and it looks as though Ms. Hill is keeping good on her promise. After much anticipation, it's been announced that the luminary will be making her way to Lagos this month accompanied by a 20-man band. Other Nigerian acts are slated to perform as well, but remain unconfirmed. The concert will take place this Sunday, August 30 at Lagos' Eko Hotel and Suites and will be hosted by Nigerian comedian Basketmouth. Purchase tickets for the show below and revisit Lauryn's apology video as well as a recent post about the singer's influence on revolutionary hip-hop groups in North Africa.

>>> Purchase tickets to Lauryn Hill live in Lagos 

 

Interview
Photo: Mariela Alvarez.

Interview: ÌFÉ Blends Music & Religion to Honor Those Who Have Died During the Pandemic

Producer and percussionist Otura Mun talks about his latest EP, The Living Dead, and how he traces the influences of West Africa in his new work.

There are bands that open up a spiritual world through their music. ÌFÉ is one example. An electro-futurist band that fuses Afro-Cuban rhythms and Jamaican dancehall with Yoruba mystical voices. With the success of their 2017 debut album "IIII+IIII" (pronounced Eji-Ogbe), ÌFÉ has reached an audience that is looking for Caribbean and contemporary sounds.

The Puerto Rican-based band just released a new EP, The Living Dead- Ashé Bogbo Egun, that aims to heal and honor those who have died during this pandemic. Otura Mun, the band leader, is an African-American producer and percussionist, who began a personal journey about a decade ago, when he landed in San Juan, and decided to move there. He learned Spanish, dug deep into his African ancestry and started to practice the Yoruba-Caribbean religion of Santería.

ÌFÉ, which means "love and expansion" in Yoruba, ties two worlds, music and religion, artistically. This new EP modernized prayer songs to hopefully make them more accessible to a younger generation. OkayAfrica spoke with Otura Mun on his latest work.

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