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Little Simz, Dave, Nao & More Earn 2019 Mercury Prize Nominations

The annual prize is awarded to the best album released in the UK.

The 2019 nominations for the UK's coveted Mercury Prize—given to the best album released by a British or Irish artist annually—has been announced.

This year's shortlist is a close race that includes a diverse group of musicians across several genres, notably the British-Nigerian MC Little Simz, who was one of OkayAfrica's 100 Women honorees this year and is nominated for her album GREY Area, as well as fellow British-Nigerian rapper Dave, the buzzing rapper behind the hit "Location," featuring Burna Boy, who earned a nomination for his debut album Psychodrama. Both albums received critical acclaim upon their release.


Other standouts include Nao for her album Saturn, as well as the experimental rock band Black Midi. This year's judges also include several popular artists and industry insiders including Stormzy, Jorja Smith, Tshepo Mokoena, Annie Mac and more.

Past Mercury Prize winners include Skepta who snagged the award in 2016 for his album Konichiwa and Sampha for his album Process in 2018.

The winner of the 2019 Mercury Prize will be announced on September 19. Check out the full shortlist below.

Nominees:

Anna Calvi - Hunter
Black Midi - Schlagenheim
Cate Le Bon - Reward
Dave - Psychodrama
Foals - Everything Not Saved Will Be Lost - Part 1
Fontaines D.C. - Dogrel
IDLES - Joy As An Act Of Resistance
Little Simz - GREY Area
NAO - Saturn
SEED Ensemble - Driftglass
Slowthai - Nothing Great About Britain
The 1975 - A Brief Inquiry Into Online Relationships


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(Photo by Gareth Cattermole/Getty Images)

The 10 Best HHP Songs Ranked

On the second anniversary of HHP's passing, we rank 10 of the South African hip-hop legend's best songs.

Jabulani Tsambo, popularly known by his alias HHP, was a pivotal part of South African hip-hop. Renowned for trailblazing the motswako sub-genre in the early 2000s, the rapper sadly passed away on October 24th, 2018 after a long and much publicised bout with depression.

During his active years, which span two decades (from 1997 to 2018), he was instrumental in breaking barriers and bridging the gap between kwaito and hip-hop in SA, from the late 90s to early 2000s.

He became a household name in the 2000s as he spearheaded the motswako movement, propelling it to the mainstream and solidifying his legendary status in the process.

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