Audio
(Taken from video)

Meet Your New Congolese Crush, Lous and the Yakuza

The young artist's first music video for "Dilemme" looks and sounds absolutely amazing.

Artist Lous and the Yakuza debuts an edgy and effortlessly cool video for "Dilemme," the first single from her upcoming debut album, Gore.

Both the track, produced by El Guincho, and video are perfect for the late September vibe–chilled out but pulsing with quiet energy. "Dilemme" is smooth trap with melodic and sombre lyrics that make you both bop and think.

The video, directed by Wendy Morgan, is somewhat biographical of 23-year-old Lous' life. In the video, Lous is literally wearing multiple identities, each complete with their own environment. These personas tell the story of her life—from growing up in Congo to proving herself as an artist in Brussels, where she now resides. It's a collision of high art and street culture. It's been a difficult if not lonely battle, and the song tells that tale. Lous is in fact speaking about wanting to be alone, the contradictions in being recognized for art and the fatigue she feels at constantly trying to find her place.


Morgan had this to say about her intentions with directing the video: "I wanted to show her resilience and find joy and kinship on top of those sad lyrics. The dancers in London and Paris recreate the spirit of Lous' real life Yakuza, the brotherhood who have supported her pursuit of art," a press statement reads.

One instance of that kinship and resilience in the face of adversity is an homage Lous pays to Alaa Salah, the iconic image of a young woman standing on a car during a Sudanese protest earlier this year.

Watch the video below and check for the debut album, Gore, to be released soon.

Lous and The Yakuza - Dilemme (Clip officiel) www.youtube.com

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OkayAfrica Presents: 'The Adinkra Oracle' December Reading with Simone Bresi-Ando

We're back with another Adinkra reading from Simone Bresi-Ando to help guide you through the end of the year—and the end of the decade.

It's the a new month and that means we're ready for a new Adinkra reading from Simone Bresi-Ando to help you navigate your December.

After cleansing the space, Simone will pull five Adinkra Ancestral Guidance Cards from a deck of 44 Adinkra symbols—these cards help to channel information, messages and direction from your ancestors using Adinkra symbols when read correctly. Remember, as Simone says, "these readings tell you what you need to know and not necessarily what you want to know—our ancestors are emotionally pure."

Simone gives a general reading of what December has in store to help you know what actions and thoughts are necessary to get the best out of the month. This is a special installment as it also guides you through the end of the year—and the end of the decade.

Watch below.

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Video: Davido Talks About His New Album 'A Good Time' & How the World Has Opened Up to Afrobeats

In 'Moments With: Davido,' the Nigerian superstar tells us about the massive success of "Fall," his relationship with Wizkid, collaborating with Popcaan, and much more.

Davido stopped by our offices in New York City during the packed days around his new album, A Good Time.

The Nigerian superstar sat down with OkayAfrica and spoke in-depth about what made "Fall" such a massive success, the new album, his reported (past) beef with Wizkid, collaborating with Popcaan on "Risky," Western artists using African sounds, and—most importantly—how "it's the world to Africa right now."

Watch our Moments With video with Davido below.

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Interview
Photo courtesy of CSA Global.

In Conversation with Congolese NBA Player Emmanuel Mudiay: 'I want more African players in the NBA.'

The Utah Jazz player talks about being African in the NBA, supporting basketball in the DRC and how 'everybody knows about Burna Boy'.

Inspired by his basketball-playing older brothers, by second grade, Emmanuel Mudiay already knew that he wanted to play in the American National Basketball Association. Then in 2001 his family, fleeing the war in Democratic Republic of Congo, sought asylum in the United States.

In America, Mudiay saw basketball as a way for him to improve his situation. After impressive high school and college careers, he moved to China to play pro ball. Picked 7th overall in the 2015 NBA draft, the now 23-year-old guard has made a name for himself this season coming off the bench for the Utah Jazz.

Mudiay attests to the sport having changed not only his life but that of his siblings. Basketball gave them all a chance at a good education and the opportunity to dream without conditions. Now he wants to see other talented African players make it too.

We caught up with him to talk about his experience as an African player in the NBA, his hopes for basketball on the African continent and who he and his teammates jam out to in their locker rooms.

This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

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University lecturer and activist Doctor Stella Nyanzi (L) reacts in court as she attends a trial to face charges for cyber-harassment and offensives communication, in Kampala, on April 10, 2017. (Photo by GAEL GRILHOT/AFP via Getty Images)

Jailed Ugandan Activist, Stella Nyanzi, Wins PEN Prize for Freedom of Expression

The outspoken activist, who is currently serving a prison sentence for a poem she wrote about the president's mother's vagina, won for her resistance "in front of a regime that is trying to suppress her."

Stella Nyanzi, the Ugandan academic, activist, and vocal critic of President Yoweri Museveni has been awarded the 2020 Oxfam Novib/PEN International award for freedom of expression, given to writers who "continue to work for freedom of expression in the face of persecution."

Nyanzi is currently serving a 15 month sentence for "cyber harassment" after she published a poem in which she wrote that she wished "the acidic pus flooding Esiteri's (the president's mother) vaginal canal had burn up your unborn fetus. Burn you up as badly as you have corroded all morality and professionalism out of our public institutions in Uganda."

According to the director of PEN International, Carles Torner, her unfiltered outspokenness around the issues facing her country is what earned her the award. "For her, writing is a permanent form of resistance in front of a regime that is trying to suppress her," said Torner at the award ceremony.

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