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You Need to Watch This Ghanaian Girl's 'Mad Over You' Mash-Up

Meet Nana Fofie, a 21-year-old upcoming Ghanaian singer who's cover of Runtown's "Mad Over You" is going viral.

"Mad Over You" was easily one of the best, and biggest, tracks last year.


In his addictive hit, Runtown sings about falling deep for a "Ghana girl." When he stopped by our offices recently, the Nigerian singer further revealed that the song is about African beauty in general.

Well, now, it's another Ghana girl's time to shine on the song.

Meet Nana Fofie, a 21-year-old upcoming Ghanaian singer, based in Rotterdam, who's cover of "Mad Over You" is quickly going viral.

Over some slick re-worked production from Reuben Isaac, Nana Fofie flips "Mad Over You" to be about a boy. She also seamlessly takes detours into other recent afrobeats standouts—including DJ Spinall & Mr Eazi's "Ohema," Eazi's "Hollup," Maleek Berry's "Let Me Know," Korede Bello's "Do Like That" and more—in this impressive mash-up.

A post shared by @nanafofiee on

Needless to say, she absolutely kills it. And people are taking notice: since it was posted a few weeks ago, the video's almost at 400K views and rising.

The cover's even sparked it's own dance challenge, the #nanamashupchallenge (see one entry above), and even Runtown himself seems to be down with the track.

Watch above for the video that will get you through this week and follow her YouTube page.

 

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Photo: Alvin Ukpeh.

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