News Brief

'Using the Poor as Accessories'—South Africans Respond to #67Minutes

Every Mandela Day the world is called to spend 67 minutes to serve in honor of Mandela's 67 years fighting for justice—but South Africans are fed up with the hypocrisy of it all.

It's Mandela Day and South Africans are once again encouraged to take a day of service to continue Nelson Mandela's call for us to make the world a better place.

The Nelson Mandela Foundation spearheads the campaign, where they have asked the world of the following since 2009:

Nelson Mandela has fought for social justice for 67 years. We're asking you to start with 67 minutes. We would be honored if such a day can serve to bring together people around the world to fight poverty and promote peace, reconciliation and cultural diversity.

Although this initiative appears to intend to spark the service bug in the global community beyond 67 minutes, many South Africans have used this action step hashtag on social media and beyond the digital realm to criticize those in privileged and political positions to make real change and a sustainable impact beyond an hour and 7 minutes every July 18.

Protestors and activists from the Housing Assembly Youth Collective built a shack with a portable toilet outside the official home of Western Cape Premier Helen Zille Wednesday morning. The came with the challenge encouraging Zille to spend her 67 minutes on Mandela Day inside the shack so she can experience what many South Africans are forced to utilize everyday, News24reports.


"We are sick and tired of living in these shacks," Mihlali Xalisile says to News24.

The youth collective also demand in a statement for "decent jobs and houses for all from the age of 18." The minimum age for one to apply for a home under the Reconstruction and Development Program (RDP) is 21.

"This has been the experience of our parents and grandparents, dying in overcrowded backyards and informal settlements," the collective adds.

Back on Twitter, South Africans continue to call out the hypocrisy #67minutes come with—including the photo ops of "service" as a means of baseless validation. Take a look at some of their thoughts below.










Photo by Culture Club/Getty Images

A TV Show About Ethiopia's Queen Sheba is in the Works

During a presentation on at the Sundance Film Festival, Onyx Collective announced that a Queen Of Sheba drama is in the works.

Onyx Collective, which exclusively produces content for Hulu, announced that a scripted one hour series centered around Queen of Sheba is underway. Onyx focuses on highlighting the stories of people in underrepresented communities, and the upcoming series, called Sheba, will fall under that umbrella.


Inspired by a true story,Sheba will be a drama that highlights the story of Africa's most well-known queen and her quest to unite Ethiopia and fortify it as one of the most economically robust nations in the world. According to The Hollywood Reporter, the series will highlight Makeda as she sojourns into a world of danger, marred with many twists and turns. Although Ryan Coogler—who has directed both of the Black Panther movies—is the executive producer for the drama, Chantelle Well, who is a writer on Yellowjackets, and Azie Tesfai, known for her role in Supergirl, will be involved in the creation of the film's roll out. (Tesfai is already the first Ethiopian person to portray a comic superhero.) In addition to working on Sheba, Tesfai is also working on The Chase for NBC. Onyx Collective, which debuted in 2021, is a Disney brand with a body of work that includes The Hair Tales, Reasonable Doubt, The Plot, and Unprisoned.

Although Wells will write the script for Sheba, it is unclear if Tesfai will also appear on-screen in addition to being an executive producer.

Image via Khaid/Listen Up.

12 Nigerian Artists to Watch in 2023

We highlight Nigeria’s best emerging talents set to make their mark this year.

Nigeria is in many ways at the forefront of the global African music movement. The country has given birth to Africa’s biggest stars, and continues to do so year on end. However, this isn’t limited to the globally-known, such as international artists like Burna Boy and Wizkid. Every big artist starts from somewhere, and every established act once had their breakout moment.

Every year Nigeria churns out a handful of potential stars in the early phases of their journey to stardom, who make their mark with singles and projects that establish them as talents to watch. From greenhorns making their official debuts to budding talents attempting to establish their first hit single runs, we’ve highlighted a number of emerging Nigerian acts with amazing potential that wield a solid chance of breaking out this year.

Check out our list of 12 Nigerian artists to watch in 2023 below.

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Photo by Joseph Okpako/WireImage/Getty Images

Tems Bags Oscar Nomination for 'Wakanda Forever' Song

Nigeria's renowned Temilade Openiyi, popularly known as Tems, scored a nomination at the 2023 Oscars for co-writing ‘Lift Me Up’, one of the songs on 'Black Panther: Wakanda Forever.'

Popular singer Nigerian singer Temilade Openiyi, better known as Tems, has scored a nomination at the 2023 Oscars for “Lift Me Up,” a song she co-wrote with Rihanna, Ludwig Göransson, and Ryan Coogler.

"Lift Me Up," which was recorded in five countries, served as the lead single for the Black Panther: Wakanda Forever soundtrack and was a tribute to Chadwick Boseman, who played King T'Challain the previous installment of the movie but passed away in 2020 after battling colon cancer.

While discussing the record in the past, Tems had mentioned that she drew inspiration for the song from people who were once in her life, but had passed away.

"After speaking with Ryan and hearing his direction for the film and the song, I wanted to write something that portrays a warm embrace from all the people that I've lost in my life. I tried to imagine what it would feel like if I could sing to them now and express how much I miss them," Tems said. "Rihanna has been an inspiration to me, so hearing her convey this song is a great honor."

Africa's history with the Oscars has also been minimal over the years. While a handful of African films have won awards at the prestigious ceremony, there hasn't been a strong presence from the motherland. So far, the only African to win an award for Best Actress was South Africa's Charlize Theron for her role in the 2003 film Monster. Ten years later, Lupita Nyong'o scored a Best Actress in a Supporting Role award for her role in 12 Years a Slave.

This year there are no African films represented in the Best International Film category. And The Woman King, a movie about the all-female unit of warriors called Agojie, was completely snubbed.

View the full list of nominees here.

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