Manu WorldStar Shares Fire Visuals for ‘Choko’

Manu WorldStar releases visuals for hit single 'Choko'.

Manu WorldStar continues trailblazing with the latest visual release for hit single "Choko" off debut album Molimo.

"Choko" music video portrays the hustle and bustle Johannesburg is known for. The video is simple, crisp and celebrates the entrepreneurial spirit espoused by most inhabitants in Joburg, Berea which is the multicultural hotspot the artist grew up in.


The Congolese born South African Afropop hitmaker is a storyteller who is proud of his heritage and "never-die spirit". The video starts out in an aerial view of Manu WorldStar kitted out in fresh earthy Congolese fabric prints and follows the day in the life of a hustler where money is constantly exchanged.

"Choko" is local slang for money, usually attributed to the South African 20 rand note for its brown chocolate colour. Towards the end of the video Manu WorldStar sits on his bicycle and counts stacks of notes including 20 rand notes. This video is just the kicker one needs to get over the week and is sure to become a hustler's mantra.

"Choko" is the hit single from debut album Molimo which dropped two weeks ago. Anatii, Gemini Major, Aubrey Qwana, Focalistic, Rouge, Rowlene and $pacely feature on the album.

Watch the music video for "Choko" by Manu WorldStar on YouTube.

Manu WorldStar - Choko (Official Music Video) www.youtube.com

From Your Site Articles
Related Articles Around the Web
Film
Photo: Sundance Film Festival

South African Director Oliver Hermanus on Remaking a Classic

The award-winning director behind Skoonheid and Moffie tackles his first film set outside his home country -- a reworking of auteur Akira Kurosawa’s Ikiru -- which is premiering at this year's Sundance Film Festival.

In Living, Oliver Hermanus’ latest film, Bill Nighy takes on the role Takashi Shimura earned a BAFTA nomination for playing in the 1952 classic, Ikiru. Except Nighy's not Mr Watanabe, he’s Mr Williams, a British version of Shimura’s workaholic who finds out he only has a short time left to live. Revered auteur Akira Kurosawa’s film made its premiere at the Berlin International Film Festival in 1954, where it would go on to win him a special prize of the senate of Berlin, before garnering acclaim for many more years to come. So, too, is Hermanus' remaking of the story bowing at a film festival, and so far, it's also been earning the South African director high praise.

Born in Cape Town, Hermanus has steadily built his career on South African-centric stories. Whether it’s the portrait of a Mitchell’s Plain mother caught between poverty and violence in Shirley Adams or the experience of gay recruits conscripted into the army in Moffie, Hermanus’ films speak to various realms of South African life. Living is his first venture outside of South Africa – not just in storyline, but in cast and crew too. The screenplay is by Nobel and Booker Prize winner Kazuo Ishiguro (The Remains of The Day) and Hermanus was brought on as director by the producers.

From debuting his first film Shirley Adams in 2009 in competition at the 62nd Locarno Film Festival, followed by Skoonheid (Beauty) at the 64th Cannes Film Festival, and The Endless River at the 72nd Venice Film Festival, where it was the first South African film to be invited to the main competition, to his fourth feature, Moffie at the 76th Venice Film Festival in 2019, Hermanus has cemented his reputation as a filmmaker to watch.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.

AFCON Stampede Leaves 8 Dead, 40+ Injured In Cameroonian Stadium

The unfortunate event took place Monday, ahead of the host country Cameroon's match against Comoros.