News Brief

Rio Police Say They Are 'Ramping Up Efforts' To Find Marielle Franco's Killers

Authorities indicate the investigation into the assassination of the popular Black Brazilian politician and activist is in its final stage.

Rio police say they are closing in on who killed Marielle Francothe high-profile Rio de Janeiro politician and activist who was assassinated on March 14, AFP reports.


Officials also say they are "ramping up efforts" to find Franco's killers, after going over two months without announcing significant progress. "The investigation is entering its final stage," Raul Jungmann, security minister, says to news site noticias.UOL. "I believe that we'll soon have results."

AFP says Jungmann also confirmed media reports that the suspects include a Rio city councilor and a jailed commander of one of the city's underground militias.

Officers from Rio's homicide department prepared a reenactment of the assassination Thursday, that was captured on Globo television, for ballistics analysis.

Franco's assassination was a huge shock to Brazil and the world—as it sparked demonstrations against Rio's surging violence, as well as peaked the global black community to learn more about the struggles of police brutality black Brazilians have been fighting against.

Colleagues suspect the motive of her assassination was due to her angering police and the militias, as she became a prominent critic of police violence in Rio, especially calling out the targeting of black people in the city's favelas.

Local media also quoted an unidentified police informant this week, saying he knew the murder was masterminded by the city councilor and militia leader who Jungmann also referred to. The informant also says the councilor and militia commander ordered Franco's killing because of her human rights activism in the violent west of Rio, a militia stronghold, AFP says.

Photography by Andile Buka.

5 South African Photo Books to Check Out

Here are some South African photo books on apartheid, jazz and Black life to familiarise yourself with.

While image-making, along with image archiving, have taken different forms over the years — advancing in tandem with photography's multiple technological advancements particularly in recent times — the idea of a compilation of images is one that is hard not to romanticise.

Photo books are cool. They look dope on the coffee table, they inspire curiosity, and they are reliable records of memory. They also make for great collector's items; and this is why we wiped the flimsy dust setting on some of our favourite photo books to get you started — should you be interested in finding and/or adding more.

This is but a cursory list of photo books from my own collection, directed mainly at the curious. For a thorough rundown of the history of photobooks in South Africa, have a look at the SAHO website's

Timeline of South African Photographic Books and Exhibitions

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Photo by Rodrigo Varela/Getty Images.

South Africa's Zozi Tunzi Takes Her Final Bow

Clad in an exquisite Xhosa gown and headwrap, Zozibini Tunzi handed over her Miss Universe crown as her unforgettable reign comes to an end.

South Africa's Zozibini Tunzi, the former Miss Universe, handed over her crown to Miss Mexico, Andrea Meza, last night at the 69th annual Miss Universe pageant. Having won the title back in 2019, Tunzi became the longest reigning queen in the pageant's history. And while the night was certainly Meza's, Tunzi undeniably stole the show in an exquisite Xhosa gown, choosing to wear a headwrap instead of her crown, as she made her final and graceful walk, bidding her fans farewell.

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News Brief

MTV Base is Finally Broadcasting The 2019 Amapiano Docu-Series, ‘Liyadlal’iPiano’

The 'Liyadlal'iPiano' docu-series does a good job at telling the backstory and developments of amapiano by interviewing some of the genre's pioneers and participants, as well as some industry veterans and insiders.

Liyadlal'iPiano, the 2019 documentary series about amapiano, is finally available for viewing. The docu-series was initially supposed to premiere on 24 September 2019 but never saw the light of day then due to legal disputes. It was reported that the creator of the show Arthur Sebela obtained a court order which stopped MTV Base from airing it.

Now, almost two years later, the docu-series has had a title change, from Behind the Amapiano Movement to Liyadlal'iPiano. The new title references a lyric from the 2019 smash hit "Kokota Piano" by Bizizi and Kaygee Daking, alongside Killer Kau.

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