News Brief

Michaela Coel Is Set to Write and Star In a New BBC Drama About Sexual Consent

She is booked and busy this year and we are here for it.

Chewing Gum and Black Earth Rising star Michaela Coel continues to flex her creative muscles in an anticipated landmark drama for BBC Two.

The broadcaster recently announced in a statement and at the Edinburgh International TV Festival that Coel has created, written and will star in Jan 22nd—a "fearless, frank and provocative" series that digs deep exploring the question of sexual consent in contemporary life and how, in the new landscape of dating and relationships, we make the distinction between liberation and exploitation.

"I feel weirdly overwhelmed and honored to be making something again," Coel says. "Something I'm making myself, with a great team."


The synopsis details:

Set in London, where gratification is only an app away, the story centers on Arabella (Coel) whose raw and personal experience of consent sits at the heart of the story. Through Arabella we meet a group of fictional friends and colleagues whose sexual adventures frequently collide with a world in which new codes of sexual practice are emerging.

Jan 22nd was commissioned by BBC Drama controller Piers Wenger and Patrick Holland, BBC Two controller.

"Michaela Coel is a unique talent and her writing for this drama explodes from the page," Wenger says in the statement. "It promises fearless, provocative and gripping storytelling exploring one of the defining issues of our times."

The series is produced by Various Artists Ltd and co-produced with FALKNA Productions. Coel is the executive producer for FALKNA, Phil Clarke for Various Artists Ltd and Wenger for BBC Two.

More details are to be announced soon.

Additionally, Coel is due to give the MacTaggart Lecture at the Edinburgh TV Festival this evening. Read more about the honor here.

News Brief
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Stonebwoy & Jahmiel Are Here to Save the Day in the New Video For 'Motion'

The latest visuals from Anloga Junction make the singers look more badass than we thought possible.

Ghanaian star Stonebwoy is back in the new year with a music video even cooler than his last.

The visuals for "Motion," another standout track from his latest album Anloga Junction featuring Jamaican superstar Jahmiel, came out this week, and the action packed video definitely matches the energies of the Afro-Caribbean duo.

The two star as bulletproof-vest clad spies, while a multi-talented army of women helps them rescue victims from an armed basement.

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The 20 Essential Olamide Songs

We dive into the Nigerian star's discography to bring you the 20 Essential Olamide Songs.

Let's get something clear: no Afropop act outdid Olamide in the 2010s, and even fewer can claim to match the sheer weight of his cultural influence. By all metrics, the 31-year-old musician reigned supreme over the sonic zeitgeist of the last decade, musically encapsulating, more than anyone, Nigerian music's trudge from fascination with Western-tinged music to the mass appeal of afrobeats.

Rising from Bariga, Baddo first punctured mainstream consciousness with his belligerent bars that positioned him as an upstart with a point to prove before going on to hold the gaze of a generation with anthemic offerings that distilled conceptual narratives on hedonism, life in Lagos, and forces that moved culture into multiple hits singles.

All this was done while maintaining a level of output that is unprecedented in Nigerian pop. From 2011 to 2017, Olamide put out at least one project every year while guesting on an uncountable number of songs that lasered his identity on contemporary Nigerian popular culture and ensured his music was always on rotation.

Carpe Diem, his 2020 album, marked the next step in the evolutionary arc of Olamide's career, easing him into elder statesman territory musically – and providing further proof of what a gifted musician Olamide is.

In honor of Olamide's career, we delved into his discography to bring you The 20 Essential Olamide Songs.

This list is in no particular order.

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Music
Photo courtesy of AYLØ.

Interview: AYLØ Bridges His Music & Universe In the 'Clairsentience' EP

The Nigerian artist talks about trusting your gut feelings, remedying imposter syndrome and why our identity is best rooted in who we are, rather than what we do.

AYLØ's evolution as an artist has led him to view sensitivity as a gift. As the alté soundscape in the Nigerian scene gains significant traction, his laser focus cuts through the tempting smokescreen of commercial success. AYLØ doesn't make music out of need or habit. It all boils down to the power of feeling. "I know how I can inspire people when I make music, and how music inspires me. Now it's more about the message."

Clairsentience, the title of the Nigerian artist's latest EP, is simply defined as the ability to perceive things clearly. A clairsentient person perceives the world through their emotions. Contrary to popular belief, clairsentience isn't a paranormal sixth sense reserved for the chosen few, our inner child reveals that it's an innate faculty that lives within us before the world told us who to be.

Born in 1994 in Benin City, Nigeria, AYLØ knew he wanted to be a musician since he was six-years-old. Raised against the colorful backdrop of his dad's jazz records and the echoes of church choirs from his mother's vast gospel collections, making music isn't something anyone pushed him towards, it organically came to be. By revisiting his past to reconcile his promising future, he shares that, "Music is about your experiences. You have to live to write shit. Everything adds up to the music."

Our conversation emphasized the importance of trusting your gut feelings, how to remedy imposter syndrome and why our identity is best rooted in who we are, rather than what we do,

This interview has been edited for purposes of brevity and clarity.

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Bobi Wine and His Wife Released from House Arrest

Ugandan politician Bobi Wine and his wife Barbara Itungo Kyagulanyi have been released from a near two-week military house arrest following a recent ruling from a Ugandan court.