News Brief

Brooklyn's MoCADA to Welcome the 51st Ooni of Ife Next Week

The Ooni of Ife, Oba Enitan Ogunwusi, is slated to touch down in NYC for a private reception and arts forum hosted by MoCADA on Monday, June 13.

Recently anointed 51st Ooni of Ife Oba Adeyeye Enitan Ogunwusi—the traditional ruler of Nigeria's Ile-Ife, considered the birthplace of all Yoruba people—has been making rounds lately.


The 40-year-old monarch visited the Lagos home of Shanghai Greenland Shenhua forward Obafemi Martin on Sunday, according to Complete Sports Nigeria.The former Inter striker posted a dimly lit video of the Ooni of Ife’s stopover.

The Oni of Ife HRM Adeyeye Enitan Ogunwusi @ my place

A video posted by Obafemi Martins (@obagoal) on

Also this photo: 

@obagoal and Ooni of Ife , Oba Adeyeye Enitan Ogunwusi (Ojajall) ?????????

A video posted by Obafemi Martins (@obagoal) on

And the National Cashew Association announced Monday that Ogunwusi plans to invest in a much needed cashew plantation that would cover 100 acres of land in Ile-Ife, Oshun, Vanguard reports.

“The dynamic traditional ruler took to cashew farming so as to create jobs and make Osun the leading cashew powerhouse in Nigeria and worldwide,” a NCAN spokesperson says.

What’s more, his Royal Majesty is slated to touch down in NYC for a private reception and arts forum hosted by Museum of Contemporary Diasporan Arts Monday, June 13.

Okayafrica’s very own CEO, Abiola Oke, will be in conversation with the traditional Yoruba monarch about the importance of African arts as part of the forum.

For more information and to RSVP, click here.

Interview
Photo: Benoit Peverelli

Interview: Oumou Sangaré Proves Why She's the Songbird of Wassoulou

We caught up with the Malian singer to talk about her new Acoustic album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

When Oumou Sangaré tells me freedom is at her core, I am not surprised. If you listen to her discography, you'll be hard-pressed to find a song that doesn't center or in some way touch on women's rights or child abuse. The Grammy award-winning Malian singer has spent a significant part of her career using her voice to fight for the rights of women across Africa and the world, a testimony to this is her naming her debut studio album Moussolou, meaning Woman. The album, a pure masterpiece that solidified Oumou's place amongst the greats and earned her the name 'Songbird of Wassoulou,' was a commercial success selling over 250,000 records in Africa and would in turn go on to inspire other singers across the world.

On her latest body of work Acoustic, a reworking of her critically acclaimed 2017 album Mogoya, Oumou Sangaré proves how and why she earned her accolades. The entirety of the 11-track album was recorded within two days in the Midi Live studio in Villetaneuse in 'live' conditions—with no amplification, no retakes or overdubs, no headphones. Throughout the album, using her powerful and raw voice that has come to define feminism in Africa and shaped opinions across the continent, Oumou boldly addresses themes like loss, polygamy and female circumcision.

We caught up with the Malian singer at the studio she is staying while in quarantine to talk about her new album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.