Popular
Monirul Bhuiyan/AFP/Getty Images

Botswana's Mokgweetsi Masisi Wins Highly Contested Elections

The ruling Botswana Democratic Party, which has been in power since the country obtained independence in 1966, won 51 percent of the vote.

On Wednesday, the Batswana people headed to the polls to cast their votes for both national parliament and local government councils. At least 931 000 reportedly turned up to the polls to vote in what was described as a highly contested election primarily between the ruling Botswana Democratic Party (BDP), under the leadership of President Mokgweetsi Masisi, and the coalition of opposition parties termed the Umbrella for Democratic Change (UDC). News24 reports that the votes have been counted and the BDP secured the minimum 29 seats in parliament required to form a government. While counting is still underway to determine who will secure the remaining 28 seats, Botswana's Chief Justice Terrence Rannowane announced that there were "sufficient results" to announce President Masisi as the winner.


According to The South African, opposition parties have rejected the election results calling them unfair. The UDC alleges that it received complains with regards to "widespread election irregularities" and "unnecessary delays" at several polling stations. While they have 30 days to lodge a formal complaint with the Independent Electoral Commission (IEC), the electoral body reports that it has not received any complaints corroborating the UDC's claims.

Botswana's former president, Ian Khama, left the BDP for the newly-formed Botswana Progressive Front (BPF) a few months ago after falling out with Masisi. Khama has since accused his successor of undermining the country's democracy following a number of changes he made to the policies Khama had put in place during his time in office.

Here are a few responses from Batswana citizens on social media:





Popular
Photo by Giles Clarke/UNOCHA via Getty Images

Cameroon Holds Vigil to Remember Children Killed in School Attack

Residents in Kumba paid their respects to the seven lives lost, and those injured during the attack over the weekend.

In the latest tragedy to come from Cameroon's historically violent clash between Anglo and Francophone citizens, seven children were murdered after attackers stormed a school with guns and machetes over the weekend.

In what has been deemed as the "darkest and saddest day," by Bishop Agapitus Nfon of Kumba, armed attackers stormed the Mother Francisca International Bilingual Academy, targeting students aged 9 to 12. The tragic event saw dozens of children injured, some critically.

The attack has shocked the nation, with both local and international agencies condemning the horrible offense. On Monday, Cameroonian President Paul Biya denounced the "horrific murder" of the school children, and alluded to the "appropriate measures" being taken in order to bring justice to the families of the victims. Prime Minister Dion Ngute Joseph shared his condolences via a tweet saying, "I bow before the memory of these innocent kids."

The Cameroonian presidency and governing body have blamed Anglophone 'separatists' for the attack, though the group claims no part in the attack.

Human rights groups, however, have blamed both opposing parties, as the conflict has led to the death of over 3,000 deaths and resulted in more than 700,000 Cameroonians fleeing their homes and the country.

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.

Interview: Meet Velemseni, Eswatini’s Queen of Soul

Soul artist Velemseni's music reflects Eswatini culture and aesthetics. "The Kingdom of Eswatini is a magical and mysterious place, and my music aims to interpret and document that mystique, drawing from genres like Swazi gospel, soul, African soul, cinematic and traditional music," says the artist.