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Montreal's 'Vues d’Afrique' Film Festival Returns For Its 31st Edition

Vues d’Afrique, one of North America’s oldest festivals for African and Caribbean films, returns to Montreal for its 31st edition.


Still from Sékou Traoré's 'L’œil Du Cyclone'

Now that Montreal spring is finally here, cinema lovers and connoisseurs are in town for the 31st edition of Vues d’Afrique, one of North America’s oldest festivals for African and Caribbean films.

With a new four-day formula, this year’s lineup includes movies by directors from Côte d'Ivoire, Cameroon, Morocco, Haiti, the Congo, and Burkina Faso. Burkinabé filmmaker Sékou Traoré’s L’œil Du Cyclone will open the festivities on April 29.

Rwandan-born model-turned-social activist Sonia Rolland will be present to receive a special prize for her documentary film Rwanda, Du Chaos Au Miracle, an intimate piece on a burgeoning post-genocide Rwanda.

Africa Connexion, which features up-and-coming directors based on the continent, is one of the most exciting sections this year, with movies like L’Amour En Bonus, a comedy from Côte d'Ivoire about two girls who embark on a road trip to celebrate their birthdays; W.A.K.A, the first feature film of Cameroonian director Francoise Ellong, tells the story of a mother who turns to prostitution to provide for her son; Coupé-Une Histoire Décalée documents the birth of the Ivorian musical phenomenon that is Coupé Décalé.

The festival is also premiering vuesdafrique.tv, a free online platform for some of the films presented during the festival. Right now only short films are available, but this summer the website will offer movie rentals for a minimal fee à la Netflix.

Festival Vues d’Afrique takes place in Montreal April 29- May 3. Watch excerpts from films showing at thee festival in the clip below.

Samantha Etane is a lover of images and words. Follow her on Twitter @samanthaetane and her lifestyle and design blog Tam + Sam.

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Photo by Don Paulsen/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Hugh Masekela's New York City Legacy

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In Questlove's magnificent documentary, Summer of Soul, he captures a forgotten part of Black American music history. But in telling the tale of the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival, the longtime musician and first-time filmmaker also captures a part of lost South African music history too.

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