Audio

Moroka's 'The Gospel of Kwaito' Mixtape

UK/SA producer Moroka shares his latest mixtape 'The Gospel of Kwaito,' and drops new single 'Running from the Law (Nomacala).'


The gospel that runs through UK/SA producer Moroka's latest mixtape is joyous. In The Gospel of Kwaito, Moroka delivers a selection of tracks that illuminate the presence of gospel music in South African kwaito tunes."Growing up in South Africa I was surrounded by sounds of African gospel and traditional song where the music is transmitted as a joyous soundtrack to weddings, funerals, protests and communal gatherings," the producer explained to us. It seems only natural that he would want to spotlight the revelry rather than the pains of gospel music.

As a result, The Gospel of Kwaito is a deep medley of voices and instruments that honors the sounds of the producer's youth in South Africa. Right from Zola's "Prophecy of the Village Pope," the guitar-sprinkled opening track featuring heartfelt woah-a-woah's from its singers, and as heard on the bouncy "Mama Ka Zuzu" by DJ Bobo, Moroka creates a jubilant 54-minute mix which ends on the reflective note of Lundi and The Jaziel Brothers's slow, drum-trodden "Ithemba Lam Likuwe." Stream Moroka's The Gospel of Kwaito and download his latest jagged guitar-riffed single "Running from the Law (Nomacala)" below.

The Gospel of Kwaito Tracklist:

1. Prophecy of the Village Pope - Zola

2. Moya - Sipho Makhabane

3. Monate (Kwaito Remix) - Brenda Fassie

4. Mama Ka Zuzu - DJ Bobo

5. Next to You - DJ Bongz

6. Re Tla Dula Re Rapela - DJ Call Me

7. Tlou - DJ Cleo

8. Track 7 - Bojo Mujo

9. Church Song (feat. Chaka-Chukwu) - DJ Killer

10. Halleluya Uyinkosi - Big Nuz

11. Inhliziyo Yam - Mzekezeke

12. Ithemba Lam Likuwe - Lundi ft The Jaziel Brothers

Photo by Meztli Yoalli Rodríguez

Dying Lagoons Reveal Mexico’s Environmental Racism

In the heart of a traditionally Black and Indigenous use area in Southwest Mexico, decades of environmental destruction now threatens the existence of these communities.

On an early morning in September 2017, in a little fishing village in the Pacific coast of Oaxaca, called Zapotalito, thousands of dead fish floated on the surface of the Chacahua-Pastoría lagoons. A 7.1-magnitude earthquake, which rattled Mexico City on September 19, was felt as far down as Zapotalito, and the very next morning, its Black, Indigenous and poor Mestizo residents, who depend on the area's handful of lagoons for food and commerce, woke up to an awful smell and that terrible scene of floating fish.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.

Watch Focalistic & Vigro Deep’s New Music Video For ‘Ke Star’

The 'Lockdown Level 1 anthem' has come to life through fire visuals.