Popular
Mr Eazi at Coachella (Youtube).

Watch Mr Eazi Shout Out "the Whole of Africa" at Coachella

During his performance of "Let Me Live."

Two of our favorites artists, Mr Eazi and Burna Boy, made their debut at Coachella 2019 over the weekend.

If you didn't catch them on the live stream, we've got a treat for you from Eazi's decked-out Lagos to London live set at the festival.

Right before his performance of "Let Me Live," his collaboration with Major Lazer, Rudimental and Anne-Marie, Mr Eazi shouted out all of Africa.

From the stage he introduced the song by saying, "My name is Mr Eazi from Nigeria. Representing Ghana, Kenya, Zambia, Zimbabwe, South Africa, in fact, the whole of Africa, you know."


Read: Why Burna Boy & Mr Eazi Are The Right Artists to Bring Afrobeats to the World

Speaking on Mr Eazi's rise our contributor Joey Akan recently wrote, "In the last two years, Mr Eazi has gone from selling phones in a Lagos market to moving his life and business to London leading many to call him the smartest musician on the continent. His 2017 deal with Apple Music to push his first mixtape... ensured that he was given prime placements on the music giant, with his art seeded into heavy streaming playlists. He also was a beneficiary of... a partnership with Diplo and Major Lazer. By the time he released his sophomore project, Life Is Eazi Vol. 2: Lagos to London, he already had ground in the UK."

Read: The Music Business of Mr Eazi

Watch Mr Eazi performing "Let Me Live" (incorrectly titled "Leave Me Alone") in the video below.

We're still waiting on good quality video from Burna Boy's performance which we'll share as soon as it drops.

Mr. Eazi - Leave Me Alone - Live at Coachella 2019 Saturday April 13, 2019 youtu.be


Audio
(Photo by Gareth Cattermole/Getty Images)

The 10 Best HHP Songs Ranked

On the second anniversary of HHP's passing, we rank 10 of the South African hip-hop legend's best songs.

Jabulani Tsambo, popularly known by his alias HHP, was a pivotal part of South African hip-hop. Renowned for trailblazing the motswako sub-genre in the early 2000s, the rapper sadly passed away on October 24th, 2018 after a long and much publicised bout with depression.

During his active years, which span two decades (from 1997 to 2018), he was instrumental in breaking barriers and bridging the gap between kwaito and hip-hop in SA, from the late 90s to early 2000s.

He became a household name in the 2000s as he spearheaded the motswako movement, propelling it to the mainstream and solidifying his legendary status in the process.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.

How You Can Help Nigeria’s #EndSARS Protests

We round up some ways you can support the movement and its cause, no matter where you are in the world.