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Comedian Munya Chawawa Signs Major Deal with Atlantic Records

Comedian Munya Chawawa Signs Major Deal with Atlantic Records

Zimbabwean-born, UK-based comedian Munya Chawawa, known for his hilarious online skits,has recently signed a lucrative deal with Atlantic Records.

Comedian Munya Chawawa has recently announced that he has signed a lucrative deal with Atlantic Records UK, this according to Greedy South. Chawawa's humorous sketches continue to land him a number of prominent deals. Unknown P, one of Chawawa's funny personalities, is the winning man who secured the deal with Atlantic Records for his humourous "drill rap". The news follows Chawawa's Netflix deal after exquisitely parodying BBC news reader, Barty Crease. The Zimbabwean-born, UK-based comedian took to Twitter to announce the news.


According Chawawa's website, Unknown P is the UK's first posh drill rapper who clearly lives in his own world. Chawawa uses satire to highlight Britain's subtle racism, for example, the British media's watered down reportage of Black Lives Matter, the coronavirus pandemic, classism and other domestic issues. The 27-year-old's sketches gained even more popularity during the global coronavirus lockdown when comedic relief was certainly a reprieve for many.

According to Bustle, Chawawa grew up in Zimbabwe before moving to the UK to a small village in Norfolk. He revealed through an interview with Campaign that he often struggled to fit in and tapped into his funny genes which he reportedly inherited from his grandfather. The comedian says that he started doing online sketches two years ago before his third one finally went viral.

Chawawa's deal may come as a surprise to many but Unknown P seems to have amassed a huge following in the UK and Europe. Atlantic Records houses notable musicians including Meek Mill, Stormzy, Ty Dolla $ign, Bruno Mars and Cardi B.

Messages of congratulations have been pouring in for Chawawa on social media.




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Photo by Andy Kropa/Getty Images

In Her Own Words: Prudence Mabhena's Experience in Shark Infested Hollywood

The star of the 2010 Oscar-winning documentary 'Music By Prudence' was promised a life of good health, fortune, and stability. But, the people who could've saved her instead profited off of her misfortune and left her high and dry.

For an industry that is hell-bent on keeping up appearances — pushing glamor and excellence — the United State’s movie industry is riddled with stories of greed, exploitation, and deceit. Hollywood has a knack for stealing the stories of often incredibly underprivileged and disadvantaged individuals and profiting off of shocked and disconnected Western audiences in what can only be understood as trauma porn. 36-year-old Zimbabwean singer Prudence Mabhena knows this story all too well.

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Arts + Culture

How a Mural in Bulawayo Has Revived a Bitter Tribal Debate

A mural depicting Ndebele leader King Lobengula hugging Shona spiritual medium Nehanda Charwe Nyakasikana by Bulawayo-based visual artist, Leeroy Spinx Brittain, has reignited a chasm between the Ndebele and the Shona in Zimbabwe.


Visual artist Leeroy Spinx Brittain, popularly known as Bow (black or white), placed his latest work on the wall of a public toilet in Zimbabwe’s second largest city, Bulawayo. The life-sized poster showed King Lobengula intimately holding Mbuya Nehanda with his left hand, while the right hand, which usually holds his spear, was holding a heart balloon.

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Photo Credit: Damilare Kuku

Damilare Kuku on How Real Life Inspired Her Hit Novel ‘Nearly All The Men in Lagos Are Mad’

OkayAfrica spoke to author Damilare Kuku about her salient breakout novel ‘Nearly All The Men in Lagos Are Mad.’

Damilare Kuku is new to Nigeria’s literary scene. But her short story collection, Nearly All The Men in Lagos Are Mad, came with a buzz. Released in October 2021, the book is a collection of twelve salient tales of young Nigerians in Lagos. Capturing the complexion of the city, it grapples with themes like love, sex, deceit, infidelity, companionship, and heartbreak.

The characters in Nearly All The Men in Lagos Are Mad are women. However, they are not just any kind of women. They are people with whom Kuku shares certain connections with.

Some of these women are friends, close acquaintances, and relatives. "One of the aims of my work as a creative artist is bringing human beings closer, especially women," Kuku told OkayAfrica. "Because women need to know that whatever they are going through, they are not alone. There are other people with the same thing happening to them."

Kuku, who loved reading books as a child, grew up between Lagos and Ile-Ife. Before her debut novel became a hit, Damilare played roles in movies. She’s made appearances in Africa Magic's television series Unbroken and Nollywood blockbusters like The Set-Up (2019), Chief Daddy (2018), and Love is War (2019). As her writing career enjoys attention and success, she landed her most important Nollywood role yet — in the Biodun Stephen-directed drama The Wildflower, released in May.

OkayAfrica caught up with Kuku on Zoom to talk about this anthology work, its inspiration, and her most important role in Nollywood yet.

Damilare Kuku book

How did you come up with the title?

The title of the novel came to me after a prayer session. I'm an unapologetic child of God, which means I rely heavily on God. I was actually in between projects and remembered I was in my one-room apartment in Yaba, Lagos — a very cute little place. I liked it, and I was so proud of the space.

Whenever I am not working, I pray. Somehow, somewhere, I was praying, inspiration came and was like, "how about you write a novel titled Nearly All The Men in Lagos Are Mad?" It wasn't even the inspiration for the stories; it was only the title. So immediately, I sent the title to a very well-known Nollywood actor's assistant. I never got a response, which discouraged me a bit, but I thought maybe it wasn't the right time, so I let it go. This was in 2019. A year later, I submitted a book to my publisher. This was the publisher who later published Nearly All The Men in Lagos Are Mad, and they were like we see potential, and we'd love you to come in for a meeting. So I went in for a meeting and they wanted to sign me on the spot.

Your book deals with themes like deceit, companionship, infidelity, social class, friendship, and heartbreak. Was there any of these themes you wanted readers to pay more attention to?

All stories in the novel are as personal as they can be. I don't have a story in the book, but each story was carefully written, which is interesting because I had all of these things written out, hoping anybody reading the book would get the message. When the message was clear, it was pretty comforting. Every particular story was of clear intention. The same thing with any of my work has always been clear. I'm always delighted when people see my message's clarity. Each story is a love letter to some woman I know.

In the story “Beard Gang” from Nearly All The Men in Lagos Are Mad, you explored how Gay men use marriage to straight women to conceal and hide their sexual orientation. Do you think Nearly All The Men in Lagos helped in any way to pinpoint how this is problematic?

Firstly LGBTQ+ community is very precious, and I'm cautious with what I say. I believe my work mirrors what is going on in the society. Take from it what you will. I tell most people I'm not here to educate you, and I'm more of a timekeeper. That's what I am as a writer. I'm saying this is what is happening. As Damilare, I believe people should be who they want to be. People should learn to accept people for who they are. That's my phenomenon; that is my theory about life. When a person shows you who they are, accept them, but on the other hand, I'm not doing that in this book. I'm simply saying that this is where our society is. Read it and then take from it what you will.

Because it would be foolhardy of me to say this is wrong or right. I'm not here to teach anybody, I'm just here to mirror the society and say how it is. I've had many reporters ask me what my view on queer people is. I don't have an opinion, and that's not because I'm trying to play it safe, but this is what society is.

Damilare Kuku green shirt

"I'm very intentional with my work, and I feel like, as a woman, I can only share stories about what it feels like to be a woman," Damilare Kuku said.

Photo Credit: Damilare Kuku

Let’s talk about the theme of sex. Why was it so essential to the stories being told in your novel?

For me, it was the characters telling their stories, and I can remember older people who had read the book who called me and said, "Is this what is happening now?" and I said yes. I told them it was different from their time when women were very conservative about their sexual life and sexuality. Nowadays, if a woman consents to sex, she's doing it of her own free will. So is that necessarily a good or a bad thing? Then again, it is not my place because if I pass judgment as a writer, I'm not doing my job telling the story. It is left to the readers to make with it what they will. I remember I did an interview a while ago and the interviewer and critic called NALMILAM not too far from pornography, and I laughed. Similarly, the book is dedicated to my mom Oluremi Abake. She started reading the book, but she also says the sex talk is a bit too much for her. But I feel like it's a normal phenomenon; young people living in Lagos are having sex, so why sugar coat it?

Was there any story in Nearly All The Men in Lagos Are Mad that was tedious or mentally draining to write?

The only thing that was quite tedious was emotions. So when my friends — the inspirations behind the stories — went through what they went through, I related as a listener. To write about their experiences, you have to become them. So I found myself being them. Sometimes I would even cry. In the story "Ode-plus complex," the main character (Jide) was a family member's experience. I became the character to understand what they went through, which helped me as an actor. It was very therapeutic.

Let's talk about your latest role in The Wildflower. Share with me what it was like to play the role

As I said, I'm very intentional with my work, and I feel like, as a woman, I can only share stories about what it feels like to be a woman, either through what friends have been through or what I know someone else has gone through. I can tell what other women go through because I am one myself, so when I got the role in The Wildflower, after several auditions, I was very excited. I wanted to tell the story of women and what they go through, abuse in the workplace and many girls go through that. They are being marginalized. Women go through a lot, and most times, some people who do these things to us don't think they've abused the woman.

In The Wildflower, my character was abused by her boss, and there was a scene after the abuse where he said to her, "If only you've been a little bit more cooperative..." and I believe most men think like this. They think, "I didn't rape you — we had sex." But no, it's rape. I told you "no." You didn't listen and went ahead to do what you wanted. When someone says "no," no should mean no. I have often heard some ridiculous views like, "when an African woman says no, she means maybe."

We are here in a society where men don't respect boundaries. They don't respect personal space, and they think it's okay to touch a girl because she's wearing a short skirt. I read a review about The Wildflower from a popular site, and the reviewer said, "absolutely not recommended because abuse has been talked about," and I actually wish I could talk to the person and say, "just because abuse has been talked about many times, doesn't mean it shouldn't be explored."






Music
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The 4 Songs You Need to Hear This Week

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Every week, we highlight the top releases through our best music of the week column. Here's our round-up of the best tracks and music videos that came across our desks.

If you like these music lists, you can also check out our Best Songs of the Month columns following Nigerian, Ghanaian, East African and South African music.

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