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Musicians Speak On South Africa After Mandela

We talk to South African musicians about what to expect in South Africa after Mandela has passed.


With Nelson Mandela recently in hospital, the narrative of "the real revolution" taking place when he passes has resurfaced - as it does every time he falls ill.

Some say he is the glue that holds South Africa together, and once he's gone, the country will unravel. This goes hand-in-hand with the annoyingly pervasive theory that oppressed South Africans never received the "cathartic" experience of a bloody revolutionary war - out of respect for Madiba, "the people" wait for his passing to truly revolt (but against whom at this point is unclear - whites? capitalism?). Others dismiss this theory as senseless fear-mongering.

We asked South African musicians their thoughts on what will happen in South Africa after Mandela. One thing they all agree on is that Mandela is NOT the glue that holds the country together - whew. Here's what they had to say:

Jumping Back Slash:

There is no question that a certain demographic of South Africa feel that when Mandela passes they will be subject to a backlash. Obviously, that demographic is white and mostly Afrikaner - particularly the Boere.

Now this is obviously nonsense. It will not happen. With the emergence of an extremely affluent black middle class will those who now wear Louis Vuitton and drive Mercedes and Bentleys put that aside to pick up a panga, turn guerilla and fight for those who don't? Nope. Will those white upper middle class and business elite suddenly find black South Africans (poor, middle class or otherwise) with pangas outside their houses by the hundreds demanding to be let in to take over the land now Mandela has died? Nope.

This is not to say that SA does not have problems with race and money and where those two subjects meet or divide. Because it does. Big time, that goes without saying.

It's merely conjecture from some strange part of this country on Facebook pages and forums and no doubt in real life conversation too.

South Africa is born from a siege mentality. It's something all South Africans share regardless of race. Fear of the Other (white, black or coloured) trying to destroy them.

If there is a glue to this country, it's not Mandela. It's the mutual mistrust each race has of the others that unites them, that is what they all share regardless of money or power. Which is quite sad when you think about it because individual thought processes like that tend to be a government's fault.

He'll die, people will mourn and eventually people will go back to getting on with their lives and talking kak about each other. That's how it is.

Spoek Mathambo:

I say yack yack yack.

I say get a grip.

I say it's nonsense.

He's old (and not holding the country together), let him die in fucking peace.

Jimmy Flexx from Ill Skillz:

It's a bit insane to assume things will fall apart when Mandela passes. The media is obsessed with his death because of the money they stand to make from it. Otherwise the people understand that he is old and ill, and on his way home.

It will take a radical catalyst character to use the tragic death of one of the greatest leaders as an opportunity to rally people up against whatever perceived enemy.

Reason:

I think the country is more concerned about his health and possible passing, than they are about fighting when he dies.

I'm not sure who would want to revolt after he dies and why, but i really do believe that his health is what's on our minds right now.

Kyla-Rose from Freshly Ground:

I think that we are dealing with a lot of issues in the day to day in South Africa - some that do flare up in incidents of violence, things like the many service delivery protests or the xenophobic attacks that occurred a few years ago...many things that are pressing issues here and many of them unresolved. And we are also quite a violent society, something that I think is a result of the scars that apartheid left us with as a nation.

Madiba is a highly revered figure worldwide and in South Africa and I think that on the whole most people feel a huge amount of respect for him -- even if some also may not agree with the quiet diplomacy approach he took to the ending of Apartheid and the concessions he made to the National Party and white South Africans, especially economically....certain concessions that have not necessarily been resolved for all South Africans.

I certainly don't believe he is the glue that holds the country together, he is of course a huge part of our story as a nation and will always be that, living or not and the country would definitely come to a stand still at the moment of his passing in order to commemorate and acknowledge him as an extremely significant historical figure, not only for ourselves but the entire world and it's quest for peaceful coexistence on this planet.

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Photo: Getty

Here's What You Need To Know About The Political Unrest In Sudan

Thousands have been protesting the Sudanese government over the weekend, supporting the military's plans for a coup.

Sudan's transitional government is in turmoil as thousands of citizens conducted a sit-in protest against them, over the weekend. A group of Sudanese citizens have called on the military to disestablish the nation's current government, as the country struggles with the greatest crisis they've seen since the end of former dictator Omar al-Bashir's controversial ruling, two years ago. The weekend's pro-military protests come as anti-military protestors took to the streets earlier this month to fight for civilian-ruled laws.

Military-aligned demonstrators assembled outside of the famously off-limits entrance of the Presidential Palace located in the Sudanese capital, Khartoum on Monday. Gatherers set up tents, blocking off access to two main intersections, cutting off access to the capital for those inside. Police attempted to wave off crowds with teargas, with Khartoum state officials saying they had, "repelled an attempted assault on the seat of government," in a statement issued Monday.

The assembly was called for by a coalition of rebel groups and political parties that support Sudan's military, accusing the civilian political parties of mismanagement and monopolizing power under their ruling. Demonstrations began on Saturday, but Sunday's gathering saw a lower attendance. According to Reuters, by Monday afternoon, thousands, between 2,000 - 3,000, had returned to voice their concerns. 52-year-old tribal elder Tahar Fadl al-Mawla spoke at the helm of the sit-in outside of the Presidential palace saying, "The civilian government has failed. We want a government of soldiers to protect the transition." Alongside a 65-year-old Ahman Jumaa who claimed to have traveled more than 900 kilometers (570 miles) from Southern region Nyala to show his support.

Protesters are demanding the appointment of a new cabinet that is "more representative of the people who participated in the December 2019 revolution that eventually led to the ousting of former president Omar al-Bashir", Al Jazeera reported from Sudan. Protesters headed towards the Presidential Palace, where an emergency cabinet meeting was being held when they were met by police forces.

Pro-civilian political parties have plans for their own demonstration on Thursday, the anniversary of the 1964 revolution that overthrew Sudan's first military regime under Ibrahim Abboud and brought in a period of democracy that the country still struggles to uphold.


Sudanese Twitter users shared their thoughts online, with many drawing similarities between the current unrest and other political crises the nation has faced.


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