News Brief
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This Muslim Woman Was Detained and Harassed On Her Way to Rome

"Islamophobia is rife—it's real" says this woman in a now viral video.

In case you need to be reminded, Islamophobia is real and it has a genuine impact on Muslims trying to go about their daily lives. As @grimworldview says in her now viral snapped/tweeted video, while she and another headscarf wearing companion were attempting to fly from London to Rome, they were targeted interrogated for two hours and had their DNA and fingerprints taken.


While seemingly random, the legal framework that allow officers to do this in the UK, as @grimworldview notes is Schedule 7 of the Terrorism Act. According to a Guardian article last year Special Branch officers have randomly stopped and questioned "up to 85,000 travellers a year at Britain's ports and airports."

The piece continues:

A study by the equalities and human rights commission found that schedule 7 was having the "single most negative impact" on British Muslim communities. "For some Muslims, these stops have become a routine part of their travel experience" and the power "is silently eroding Muslim communities' trust and confidence in policing," it said.

Meanwhile in the United States, laws already stacked against Muslim travelers were given a boost when the Supreme Court ruled that Trump's latest version of a ban on travel to the United States from six Muslim-majority countries could go into effect, even as lower courts debate its constitutionality.

How that kind of high-level Islamophobia trickles down to the masses is hard to quantify but anecdotally it seems to be rife among Trump supporters. Another video went viral last week of a woman confronting a family of Trumpists after they referred to her 5-year-old cousin as a terrorist. Watch it below:

Rania Yasin, the woman who filmed the video's cousin, then posted it on Twitter where the racists were quickly identified.

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Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images.

Ethiopian Prime Minister Responds to Trump's Claims of Being Snubbed for the 2019 Nobel Peace Prize

Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed says that Trump's issue with the Nobel Peace Prize recipient 'must be taken up in Oslo, not Ethiopia'.

UPDATE 01/13: Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed is currently in South Africa to seek mediation from President Cyril Ramaphosa in light of the deadlock with Egypt over a potential hydropower project on the Nile River.

At a press briefing in Pretoria, Ahmed responded to questions around President Donald Trump's recent claims to having been snubbed for the 2019 Nobel Peace Prize although he was allegedly instrumental in "saving Ethiopia", according to the BBC.

Last year, Ahmed was awarded the prize largely for his role in ending the two-decade long border conflict with neighbouring country Eritrea.

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Photo by Xaume Olleros/Getty Images.

Malian Government Claims Anti-Trump Tweets Were a 'Handling Error'

A former Malian government official allegedly used President Ibrahim Boubacar Keita's official Twitter account to describe Trump's recent drone strike on Iraq as a "fuck up".

This past Monday, a number of tweets which referred to President Donald Trump's recent drone strike on Iraq as a "fuck up", were sent from Malian President Ibrahim Boubacar Keita's official Twitter account.

According to News24, the Malian government now claims that the since-deleted tweet was a a result of a "handling error" after a former government official mistook the Twitter account as his own personal one.

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Interview
Photo courtesy of CSA Global.

In Conversation with Congolese NBA Player Emmanuel Mudiay: 'I want more African players in the NBA.'

The Utah Jazz player talks about being African in the NBA, supporting basketball in the DRC and how 'everybody knows about Burna Boy'.

Inspired by his basketball-playing older brothers, by second grade, Emmanuel Mudiay already knew that he wanted to play in the American National Basketball Association. Then in 2001 his family, fleeing the war in Democratic Republic of Congo, sought asylum in the United States.

In America, Mudiay saw basketball as a way for him to improve his situation. After impressive high school and college careers, he moved to China to play pro ball. Picked 7th overall in the 2015 NBA draft, the now 23-year-old guard has made a name for himself this season coming off the bench for the Utah Jazz.

Mudiay attests to the sport having changed not only his life but that of his siblings. Basketball gave them all a chance at a good education and the opportunity to dream without conditions. Now he wants to see other talented African players make it too.

We caught up with him to talk about his experience as an African player in the NBA, his hopes for basketball on the African continent and who he and his teammates jam out to in their locker rooms.

This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

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University lecturer and activist Doctor Stella Nyanzi (L) reacts in court as she attends a trial to face charges for cyber-harassment and offensives communication, in Kampala, on April 10, 2017. (Photo by GAEL GRILHOT/AFP via Getty Images)

Jailed Ugandan Activist, Stella Nyanzi, Wins PEN Prize for Freedom of Expression

The outspoken activist, who is currently serving a prison sentence for a poem she wrote about the president's mother's vagina, won for her resistance "in front of a regime that is trying to suppress her."

Stella Nyanzi, the Ugandan academic, activist, and vocal critic of President Yoweri Museveni has been awarded the 2020 Oxfam Novib/PEN International award for freedom of expression, given to writers who "continue to work for freedom of expression in the face of persecution."

Nyanzi is currently serving a 15 month sentence for "cyber harassment" after she published a poem in which she wrote that she wished "the acidic pus flooding Esiteri's (the president's mother) vaginal canal had burn up your unborn fetus. Burn you up as badly as you have corroded all morality and professionalism out of our public institutions in Uganda."

According to the director of PEN International, Carles Torner, her unfiltered outspokenness around the issues facing her country is what earned her the award. "For her, writing is a permanent form of resistance in front of a regime that is trying to suppress her," said Torner at the award ceremony.

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