News

Netflix Is Officially Live In Africa

Now you can Netflix and chill in Africa. The streaming service is officially launched across the continent and worldwide.

Idris Elba in the Netflix original film Beasts of No Nation


Finally, you can Netflix and chill in Africa. As of today, the subscription-based streaming service has officially launched across the continent and worldwide (with the exception of China).

Netflix Co-founder and Chief Executive Reed Hastings made the announcement during his keynote speech at CES (the Consumer Electronics Show) in Las Vegas. "Today you are witnessing the birth of a new global Internet TV network," Hastings said. "We're looking forward to bringing great stories from all over the world to people all over the world."

The news comes after weeks of speculation that a South Africa launch was in the pipeline for Netflix in 2016, and a year after the company first hinted at plans to include South Africa as part of its global expansion. "We have not provided details of when we plan to go where, but you can be confident South Africa is among the countries we intend to serve sometime in the next two years," Netflix is reported to have said last January.

This prompts the question, with Netflix now entering the African market, what does this mean for African content on Netflix? We’ve previously highlighted ten of the best titles related to Africa and the diaspora currently available for streaming on Netflix, and we’ll soon be bringing you a few more. But considering the wealth of incredible films and TV shows coming from the continent, the options are still limited.

Interview

Interview: Wavy The Creator Is Ready to See You Now

The multidisciplinary Nigerian-American artist on tapping into all her creative outlets, creating interesting things, releasing a new single and life during quarantine.

A trip canceled, plans interrupted, projects stalled. It is six months now since Wavy the Creator has had to make a stop at an undisclosed location to go into quarantine and get away from the eye of the pandemic.

The professional recording artist, photographer, writer, fashion artist, designer, and evolving creative has been spending all of this time in a house occupied by other creatives. This situation is ideal. At least for an artist like Wavy who is always in a rapid motion of creating and bringing interesting things to life. The energy around the house is robust enough to tap from and infuse into any of her numerous creative outlets. Sometimes, they also inspire trips into new creative territories. Most recently, for Wavy, are self-taught lessons on a bass guitar.

Wavy's days in this house are not without a pattern, of course. But some of the rituals and personal rules she drew up for herself, like many of us did for internal direction, at the beginning of the pandemic have been rewritten, adjusted, and sometimes ditched altogether. Some days start early and end late. Some find her at her sewing machine fixing up thrift clothes to fit her taste, a skill she picked up to earn extra cash while in college, others find her hard at work in the studio, writing or recording music.

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