Popular
Photo courtesy of Netflix


Back row (From L-R): Banky W, Ted Sarandos (Netflix Chief Content Officer), Kate Henshaw, Richard Mofe-Damijo, Felipe Tewes (Netflix Italian & African Originals Director), Omoni Oboli, Ben Amadasun (Netflix Africa Licensing Director) and Akin Omotoso. Front Row (L-R) Mo Abudu, Adesua Etomi, Dorothy Ghettuba (Netflix African Originals lead) , Kunle Afolayan, Kemi Adetiba and Ramsey Noah.

Netflix's First Nigerian Original Is Coming—Here's What We Know About It So Far

The six-part drama, directed by Akin Omotoso, is about 'a goddess reincarnated as a human to avenge her sister's death.'

Last week, streaming giant Netflix, announced that it would be expanding its presence in Nigeria's creative scene with the newly launched Netflix Naija.

News around the release of an upcoming Nigerian original also surfaced. Now, more details around Netlfix's first-ever Nigerian original, which is currently unnamed, have emerged.

The show, currently being referred to as the "Akin Omotoso Project," after its director and writer, is a six-part series "Set in modern-day Nigeria and shot in Lagos," according to a press release. Omotoso, who is also an actor, has directed several films and also starred in 2017's Catching Feelings. "This drama tells the story of Kemi, a goddess reincarnated as a human to avenge her sister's death. But first, she must learn how to use and harness her super powers to defeat her enemies and save her family from destruction."


The show is being directed alongside fellow Nigerian filmmakers Daniel Oriahi and CJ Obasi. It boasts an extensive cast of Nollywood stars, including Kate Henshaw and Ade Laoye. As well as Richard Mofe Damijo, Joke Silva, Fabian Adeoye Lojede, Kehinde Bankole, Ayoola Ayolola, Toyin Oshinaike, Goodness Emmanuel, Ireti Doyle, Fabian Adeoye Lojede, Bimbo Akintola, Tope Tedela and Ijeoma Grace Agu. A premiere date is yet to be announced.

Netflix acquired several Nigerian films throughout last year, including Merry Men, The Real Yoruba Demons, The Wedding Party 2, and King of Boys to name a few. In 2018 it picked up Genevieve Nnaji's directorial debut Lionheart.

Last month it enabled Nigerian users to be able to pay for its services in Naira, which will reportedly make access to the platform easier for Nigerian subscribers.

Speaking on the success of such content, "Movies like King of Boys, Merry Men and The Bling Lagosian have shown how much our members love Nigerian movies. So we're incredibly excited to be investing in Made in Nigeria stories - bringing them to audiences all around the world."

Netflix premiered its "first African original" this past Friday, with the release of South Africa's Queen Sono, starring Pearl Thusi, which has been described as an action-packed spy thriller that challenges stereotypes about African womanhood. Other African originals set to be released this year include Blood & Water and the Zambia's animated series Mama K's Team 4.

Music

6 Samples From 'Éthiopiques' in Hip-Hop

A brief history of Ethio-jazz cultural exchange featuring songs by Nas & Damian Marley, K'naan, Madlib and more.

This article was originally published on OkayAfrica in March, 2017. We're republishing it here for our Crossroads series.

It's 2000 something. I'm holed up in my bedroom searching for samples to chop up on Fruity Loops. While deep into the free-market jungle of Amazon's suggested music section, I stumble across a compilation of Ethiopian music with faded pictures of nine guys jamming in white suit jackets. I press play on the 30 second sample.

My mind races with the opportunities these breakbeats offered a budding beat maker. Catchy organs, swinging horns, funky guitar riffs, soulful melodies and grainy and pained vocalists swoon over love lost and gained. Sung in my mother tongue—Amharic—this was a far cry from the corny synthesizer music of the 1990s that my parents played on Saturday mornings. I could actually sample this shit.

The next day, I burn a CD and pop it into my dad's car. His eyes light up when the first notes ooze out of the speakers. “Where did you get this?" He asks puzzlingly. “The internet," I respond smiling.

In the 1970s my dad was one of thousands of high school students in Addis Ababa protesting the monarchy. The protests eventually created instability which lead to a coup d'état. The monarchy was overthrown and a Marxist styled military junta composed of low ranking officers called the Derg came to power. The new regime subsequently banned music they deemed to be counter revolutionary. When the Derg came into power, Amha Eshete, a pioneering record producer and founder of Ahma Records, fled to the US and the master recordings of his label's tracks somehow ended up in a warehouse in Greece.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.

How Nigerian Streetwear Brand, Daltimore, is Rising To Celebrity Status

We spoke with founder and creative director David Omigie about expression through clothing and that #BBNaija pic.