Photos
Azania Mosaka who hosted the summit. Photo by Austin Malema.

In Photos: OkayAfrica and Global Citizen’s Next 100 Summit

Relive The Next 100 Summit in these images by Austin Malema.

The Grammy-winning Soweto Gospel Choir's energetic performance set the tone for thought leaders from across the continent to share how to better life on the continent in the next 100 years. Perhaps the most moving moment was when Makaziwe Mandela-Amuah (CEO, House of Mandela), shared that she felt women empowerment starts with women being taught how to make money, because "money runs the world."


The Next 100 Summit, brought to you by OkayAfrica and Global Citizen, took place at The Venue in Melrose Arch in Joburg last week Thursday. It was part of a series of events that commemorated the centennial birth year of Nelson Mandela, the late anti-apartheid struggle hero and former president of South Africa.

Mandela is known to stand for hope, and his visions for a unified South Africa have inspired many change makers across the globe. For instance, Beyoncé recently wrote an open letter to Madiba expressing how much he inspired her.

On the day, there were panels robustly exploring exclusion and inclusion in the arts and business world, influencer culture, the role played by women in different fields and the challenges they face, music as a tool to foster social change, among other topics.

Panelists and moderators who shared their insights on the day included Dr. Precious Moloi Motsepe (co-founder and CEO of the Motsepe Foundation), Pearl Thusi (actress and Mandela 100 advocate), Trevor Stuurman (entrepreneur and multimedia visual artist), Amonge Sinxoto (youth activist and founder, Blackboard Africa), Makaziwe Mandela-Amuah (CEO, House of Mandela), Yvette Gayle (chief communications officer, Africa Creative Agency) and a whole lot more.

Performances on the day came from The Soweto Gospel Choir, Nonku Phiri, The Soil, Amanda Black, Samthing Soweto and DJ Doowap. Trevor Sturrman also curated a multi-discipline showcase that blended music, fashion and photography.

You can relive the experience in these photos taken by esteemed South African culture photographer Austin Malema (get to know him here).

The Soweto Gospel Choir opens the event. Photo by Austin Malema.

Abiola Oke, Pearl Thusi, George Sebulela, Sherwin Charles and Merafe Moloto. Photo by Austin Malema.

The audience. Photo by Austin Malema.

Photo by Austin Malema.



Thabiso Khati, Tuma Basa, Yvette Gayle, Ugo Mozie. Photo by Austin Malema.

Fireside chat between Dr. Precious Moloi Motsepe and Maria Makhabane. Photo by Austin Malema.

Photo by Austin Malema.

Photo by Austin Malema.

Upile Chisala, who moderated the panel "Who Runs The World? Girls." Photo by Austin Malema.


Remarks Randall Lane (Chief Content Officer, Forbes). Photo by Austin Malema.

Photo by Austin Malema.

Photo by Austin Malema.


Photo by Austin Malema.

DJ Doowap. Photo by Austin Malema.

The Next 100 Summit Concert

Nonku Phiri. Photo by Sabelo Mkhabela.


Photo by Sabelo Mkhabela.


Samthing Soweto. Photo by Sabelo Mkhabela.

Photo by Sabelo Mkhabela.

Photo by Sabelo Mkhabela.

Amanda Black. Photo by Sabelo Mkhabela.

The Soil. Photo by Sabelo Mkhabela.

DJ Doowap's dancers. Photo by Sabelo Mkhabela.

Interview
Photo: Benoit Peverelli

Interview: Oumou Sangaré Proves Why She's the Songbird of Wassoulou

We caught up with the Malian singer to talk about her new Acoustic album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

When Oumou Sangaré tells me freedom is at her core, I am not surprised. If you listen to her discography, you'll be hard-pressed to find a song that doesn't center or in some way touch on women's rights or child abuse. The Grammy award-winning Malian singer has spent a significant part of her career using her voice to fight for the rights of women across Africa and the world, a testimony to this is her naming her debut studio album Moussolou, meaning Woman. The album, a pure masterpiece that solidified Oumou's place amongst the greats and earned her the name 'Songbird of Wassoulou,' was a commercial success selling over 250,000 records in Africa and would in turn go on to inspire other singers across the world.

On her latest body of work Acoustic, a reworking of her critically acclaimed 2017 album Mogoya, Oumou Sangaré proves how and why she earned her accolades. The entirety of the 11-track album was recorded within two days in the Midi Live studio in Villetaneuse in 'live' conditions—with no amplification, no retakes or overdubs, no headphones. Throughout the album, using her powerful and raw voice that has come to define feminism in Africa and shaped opinions across the continent, Oumou boldly addresses themes like loss, polygamy and female circumcision.

We caught up with the Malian singer at the studio she is staying while in quarantine to talk about her new album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

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