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You Need to Watch These New Videos From Nigerian Rapper Nezi Momodu

Check out the new music videos from her mixtape, The Endless Hour.

Nezi Momodu is a Texas-based Nigerian rapper notorious for her freestyles, but her new mixtape, The Endless Hour, showcases both her rapping and her singing skills.

Momodu just dropped two videos— "Broken" and "The Endless Hour (Outro)"—that feature songs from that new mixtape which was released in June.


Sharing the experiences that have shaped the new project she told OkayAfrica:

"The entire mixtape is an ode to '90s and early 2000s. Making the videos, especially 'Broken,' I wanted something very simple. I'm Nigerian of course, and I also am Muslim, and I wanted something that paid homage to my culture yet [my] still feeling 'empty.' The song is about how life and time almost stands still like a broken clock. I wanted the video to have all that space and void of something that could be whole, but wasn't. I took the time to hand sew each outfit I wore and really make sure it looked exactly how I envisioned. In short, it became a video with these beautiful pieces and still shots that are somewhat fragmented and alone."

"'The Endless Hour (Outro)' has the most rapping in the whole tape, and is the longest song. The video is a cumulation of all the other videos as well as a map of how I've come lyrically. Before I started on the mixtape, I worked on a mural for a couple months which really helped clear my mind. I wanted that to be in there along with the community it represents. It's a restaurant called Catfish Smith on South Lamar in Dallas. Overall it has a sense of summary and I honestly love the nostalgia it gives me, and I wanted to share that with everyone."

The Endless Hour mixtape is available on all streaming services. Listen to it on Soundcloud below and grab it on iTunes.

Check out the videos below, which were both shot by Renée Thompson of AENL.



Interview
Photo: Benoit Peverelli

Interview: Oumou Sangaré Proves Why She's the Songbird of Wassoulou

We caught up with the Malian singer to talk about her new Acoustic album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

When Oumou Sangaré tells me freedom is at her core, I am not surprised. If you listen to her discography, you'll be hard-pressed to find a song that doesn't center or in some way touch on women's rights or child abuse. The Grammy award-winning Malian singer has spent a significant part of her career using her voice to fight for the rights of women across Africa and the world, a testimony to this is her naming her debut studio album Moussolou, meaning Woman. The album, a pure masterpiece that solidified Oumou's place amongst the greats and earned her the name 'Songbird of Wassoulou,' was a commercial success selling over 250,000 records in Africa and would in turn go on to inspire other singers across the world.

On her latest body of work Acoustic, a reworking of her critically acclaimed 2017 album Mogoya, Oumou Sangaré proves how and why she earned her accolades. The entirety of the 11-track album was recorded within two days in the Midi Live studio in Villetaneuse in 'live' conditions—with no amplification, no retakes or overdubs, no headphones. Throughout the album, using her powerful and raw voice that has come to define feminism in Africa and shaped opinions across the continent, Oumou boldly addresses themes like loss, polygamy and female circumcision.

We caught up with the Malian singer at the studio she is staying while in quarantine to talk about her new album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

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