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Frustrated Nigerians Take to the Streets to Protest Motorcycle Ban

Hundreds of Nigerians living in Lagos have taken to the streets to protest against the recent motorcycle ban.

The Nigerian government recently introduced a ban on two- and three-wheeled motorcycles known as "okada" in the city of Lagos. According to them, the ban is meant to reduce road accidents as well as "chaos and disorderliness" Aljazeera reports.

However, just a week into the introduction of the ban, frustrated Nigerians in Lagos have taken to the streets to protest against the ban.


A popular and more cost-effective mode of transport, the ban on the commercial motorcycles has left Lagos in a state of greater traffic congestion in addition to longer queues for other forms of transportation among commuters.

One protester told Aljazeera that the people felt there was an alternative to the ban which has cost many their livelihoods. "This ban doesn't solve any of the problems attached to it. More people are suffering to get to work ... and school. And several thousand [of people] have just lost their livelihood." She added that, "There are so many things wrong with Lagos. The touts on the roads; the terrible state of the roads; those should be fixed first."

Kayode Adegbola, the founder, and lead advisor of Golborne Road Advisory shares his expertise on the matter saying, "The government has the power to issue such a restriction and considering what happened, the only thing that could have possibly prevented it, would have been increased engagement between the union of road transport workers, the ride-hailing platforms, and the government themselves."

Surprisingly, the Nigerian government allegedly reported that they were "not unaware that enforcing this directive may lead to some job losses" and added that the governor was set to announce measures to tackle the effects of the order, according to the BBC.

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Six Things History Will Remember Kenneth Kaunda For

News of Kenneth David Kaunda's passing, at age 97, has reverberated across the globe. Kaunda, affectionately known as KK, was Zambia's first President from 1964 to 1991.

Following Nelson Mandela's passing in December 2013, Kenneth Kaunda became Africa's last standing hero. Now with his passing on Thursday, June 17 — after being admitted to the Maina Soko Military Hospital in Lusaka earlier in the week — this signals the end of Africa's liberation history chapter.

It is tempting to make saints out of the departed. The former Zambian struggle hero did many great things. He was, after all, one of the giants of the continent's struggle against colonialism. Ultimately however, he was a human being. And as with all humans, he lived a complicated and colourful life.

Here are six facts you might not have known about him.

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