Film

Nigerian Artists Might Soon Be Banned From Shooting Videos Abroad

Minister of Information and Culture, Lai Mohammed, believes that the practice takes away from Nigerian film practitioners and affects the country’s economy.

Nigerian music videos and TV shows that are shot outside of the country might soon become a thing of the past.


The news website allAfrica reports that Minister of Information and Culture, Lai Mohammed believes that the practice takes away from Nigerian film practitioners and affects the country’s economy.

“This government has agreed that henceforth, whatever we consume in Nigeria in terms of music and films, must be made in Nigeria,” the site quoted Mohamed saying. “We cannot continue to go to South Africa or any other country to produce our films and then send them back to be consumed in Nigeria. The Broadcasting Code and the Advertising Code are very clear on this. For you to classify a product as a Nigerian product, it must have a certain percentage of Nigerian content.”

His intentions naturally drew criticism from Nigerians, who, according to the Premium Times, asked the minister to address the issue of government officials going for medical treatment abroad first before sanitising the movie industry.

The minister has since addressed this criticism in an interview with the paper, saying that every country is supposed to respect the local industry of other countries. “For example,” he said, “in Ghana they introduced a law today that demands visiting actors to pay a thousand dollars to the government coffers while visiting directors and producers pay 5,000 dollars. We must create an enabling environment and also generate revenue from our creative industry.”

The minister said that there were loopholes in the Nigerian Broadcasting Code (NBC), which he is in the process of amending. “The NBC code today as it stands has been exploited and not defined and that’s why movies being directed by Nigerians with Nigerian actors, actresses can be shot in South Africa and then brought back to be consumed in Nigeria,” he said.

Among some of the artists who have responded to the minister's words is Jude Okoye, who manages the duo P-Square. He expressed his sentiments in an Instagram post, saying that the government was hypocritical because it has never supported the industry in the first place.

Smh. An industry they NEVER encouraged, supported or empowered is what they now want to control,” he wrote. “Let all of you stop running to abroad when you are sick as na Naija money una dey use patronize oyibo hospital dem.”

You can read his full post below, and the minister's interview with the Premium Times here.

News Brief
Photo: Getty

Here's What You Need To Know About The Political Unrest In Sudan

Thousands have been protesting the Sudanese government over the weekend, supporting the military's plans for a coup.

Sudan's transitional government is in turmoil as thousands of citizens conducted a sit-in protest against them, over the weekend. A group of Sudanese citizens have called on the military to disestablish the nation's current government, as the country struggles with the greatest crisis they've seen since the end of former dictator Omar al-Bashir's controversial ruling, two years ago. The weekend's pro-military protests come as anti-military protestors took to the streets earlier this month to fight for civilian-ruled laws.

Military-aligned demonstrators assembled outside of the famously off-limits entrance of the Presidential Palace located in the Sudanese capital, Khartoum on Monday. Gatherers set up tents, blocking off access to two main intersections, cutting off access to the capital for those inside. Police attempted to wave off crowds with teargas, with Khartoum state officials saying they had, "repelled an attempted assault on the seat of government," in a statement issued Monday.

The assembly was called for by a coalition of rebel groups and political parties that support Sudan's military, accusing the civilian political parties of mismanagement and monopolizing power under their ruling. Demonstrations began on Saturday, but Sunday's gathering saw a lower attendance. According to Reuters, by Monday afternoon, thousands, between 2,000 - 3,000, had returned to voice their concerns. 52-year-old tribal elder Tahar Fadl al-Mawla spoke at the helm of the sit-in outside of the Presidential palace saying, "The civilian government has failed. We want a government of soldiers to protect the transition." Alongside a 65-year-old Ahman Jumaa who claimed to have traveled more than 900 kilometers (570 miles) from Southern region Nyala to show his support.

Protesters are demanding the appointment of a new cabinet that is "more representative of the people who participated in the December 2019 revolution that eventually led to the ousting of former president Omar al-Bashir", Al Jazeera reported from Sudan. Protesters headed towards the Presidential Palace, where an emergency cabinet meeting was being held when they were met by police forces.

Pro-civilian political parties have plans for their own demonstration on Thursday, the anniversary of the 1964 revolution that overthrew Sudan's first military regime under Ibrahim Abboud and brought in a period of democracy that the country still struggles to uphold.


Sudanese Twitter users shared their thoughts online, with many drawing similarities between the current unrest and other political crises the nation has faced.


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