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A New Online Exhibition Of Nigerian Photography

The Photographic Museum of Humanity launches an online exhibition of Nigerian photography curated by Azu Nwabogu.

All images courtesy of The Photographic Museum of Humanity


The Photographic Museum of Humanity, which launched in 2013 as the first "internet museum" dedicated to contemporary photography, has recently unveiled a new series dedicated to contemporary photography from Nigeria. Curated by LagosPhoto founder Azu Nwabogu, the virtual show offers insight into the work of a group of emerging Nigerian photographers interested in exploring identity, relationships, and cultural representation in modern society.

Nigerian Photography includes work by a group of four visual artists who, according to Nwabogu, represent the younger generation of his country's photography landscape. On display now through July 20th, the exhibition includes Uche Okpa Iroha's photo manipulation series The Plantation Boy, in which the artist digitally inserted himself into key scenes from The Godfather in order to explore representation, identity and media dynamics of race; self-portrait photographer Jenevieve Aken's "super femme fatale" character subverting the patriarchal male gaze in Masked Woman; Ima Mfon's The Nigerian Identity, featuring a uniform series of  black-and-white portraits devoid of cultural signifiers to suggest and reject different ideas of what it means to be Nigerian; and Lakin Ogunbanwo's The Human Condition, which makes use of the Lagos cityscape as a means of exploring the dynamics of personal relationships.

Nigerian Photography, curated by Azu Nwabogu, and featuring the work of Uche Okpa Iroha, Jenevieve Aken, Ima Mfon, and Lakin Ogunbanwo, is exhibiting via The Photographic Museum of Humanity until July 20th.

Interview
Photo: Lex Ash (@thelexash). Courtesy of Simi.

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