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Nigerians Rally Online to Demand Justice In the Rape of 23-Year-Old Woman

#JusticeForRapeInNigeria is the online movement, demanding that the perpetrators of a recent rape case in Lagos be brought to justice.

Several vocal Nigerians have taken to social media to demand that two young men, accused of drugging and raping a 23-year-old woman on camera, in the Lekki area of Lagos State, be brought to justice immediately.

Initial reports on the arrest of the two men involved—identified as 28-year-old Razaq Oluwaseun Oke and 25-year-old Don-Chima George—varied, with some stating that the two were in custody and others reporting that they'd been let go because of their parent's connections—George is reportedly the son of a wealthy hotel owner. This caused a fury of backlash from Nigerians on social media. "This is Nigeria where anyone can get away with rape," wrote Twitter user KingNelo2.


However, the Lagos State Police have reportedly refuted claims that the perpetrators had been released. According to a report from Pulse Nigeria, Police Public Relations Officer, CSP Chike Oti, released a statement saying that the duo remained in custody at the Kirikiri Prison and had been arraigned earlier in the week.

"The Lagos State Police Command hereby states that the accused persons were arraigned before the Family Court 3, Ogba Magistrates' Court on Wednesday, February 6, 2019, for the offense of conspiracy and sexual assault by penetration to wit; rape," he was quoted as saying.

However, many Nigerians remain skeptical about the validity of these statements as well as the overall handling of the case, and are calling on officials to provide further evidence of Oke and Geroge's arrest to the public.

Because of the lack of trust in governmental institutions, many remain uncertain of the true status of the two perpetrators, and the lack of adequate media coverage has only exacerbated feelings of discontent around the handling of the case.

"It is underreported in Nigerian media because Nigeria has abysmal human rights laws and practices and is even more unjust towards women," says London-based lifestyle blogger and Fisayo Longe—a vocal proponent of the #JusticeForRapeInNigeria online movement that is currently trending as a result of the mishandling of the case. "It is such a misogynistic society that does not value women," she tells OkayAfrica. "It is underreported in international media because it is underreported in local media, police do not release official statements so there are no verifiable sources for the international media to document the story from."

Several people online have shared similar views, pointing to a harmful, misogynistic culture in Nigeria of not taking allegations of rape against women seriously and a justice system that allows certain wealthy citizens to buy their freedom, thus allowing them to commit crimes with impunity.






The immense response on social media shows that despite systemically harmful practices that often silence victims of rape, many Nigerians are unwilling to allow such injustices to continue without speaking out against them. "There [is] a shocking, unrealistically low amount of convicted rapists in Nigeria—they routinely get away with the crime," adds Longe. "It is important that we remain unapologetically vocal because women's lives are in danger—literally."

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Listen to 10 Great Songs From Johnny Clegg

Here are some of the best songs to remember South Africa's son of the soil.

Yesterday, it was confirmed that South African musician, Johnny Clegg, passed away after a long battle with cancer.

Understandably, heartfelt tributes have been pouring in ever since. Long before it was cool (or even legal) to be in close proximity to blackness and anything attached to it in South Africa, Clegg, a white man, was doing just that. That is exactly why he was given the endearing title of South Africa's "son of the soil."

Growing up during Apartheid, Clegg was taught how to speak the Zulu language by a domestic worker named Charlie Mzila. In his teenage years, his appreciation for the Zulu culture continued and he soon learnt the traditional dance styles known as isishameni and also learnt how to play the Maskandi guitar. Clegg's music was a beacon of light during a very dark time in South Africa's history and his songs about Nelson Mandela (at a time where songs were banned for merely mentioning the name of the late statesman and other key struggle activists) brought the country together.

It is irrefutable that a music giant has fallen. However, Clegg leaves behind a wealth of music featuring other great South African artists and groups such as Zakwe, Brenda Fassie, Miriam Makeba, Hugh Masekela and Juluka/Suvuka, among several others. His music undeniably brought South Africans and people all around the world together.

We've picked ten of our favorite songs from the late musician's discography in honor of a life that was lived to the fullest.

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Stonebwoy in "Tuff Seed"

The 12 Songs You Need to Hear This Week

Featuring Stonebwoy, Mahmoud Ahmed, Tiwa Savage x Zlatan, Africa Express, Juls x Mr Eazi and more.

Every week, we highlight the cream of the crop in music through our Best Music of the Week column.

Here's our round up of the best tracks and music videos that came across our desks, which you can also check out in our Songs You Need to Hear This Week playlists on Spotify and Apple Music.

Follow our SONGS YOU NEED TO HEAR THIS WEEK playlist on Spotify here and Apple Music here.

Check out all of OkayAfrica's new playlists on Spotify and Apple Music.

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Beyoncé Wore These 2 African Designers in Her Music Video for 'Spirit'

Queen Bey continues to include and give a nod to African talent in her visuals.

As we draw even closer to Disney's The Lion King opening in theaters this week, Beyoncé continues to lead the way with her new music video for "Spirit"—the first single off of the film's album she produced and curated, The Lion King: The Gift.

Shot in the Havasu Falls in Arizona's Grand Canyon, Beyoncé and her legion of beautiful dancers are one with nature and its various elements as she beckons us to be brave and hear the calling of spirit. As we noted when she announced the album, the track opens with a call and response in Swahili that translates to "Long live the king": Uishi kwa mda mrefu mfalme—uishi kwa.

Keeping our eyes peeled for African influences in the music video, it's evident that is seen in the choreography. We even spotted our extended fam with the afrobeats moves—the AVO Boys: Stephen Ojo and Caleb Bonney—as two of her dancers in the video.

Beyoncé continues to also give a nod to African talent through the looks she donned in "Spirit" styled by her mainstay, Zerina Akers.

Take a look at the two African designers she wore in the video below.

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